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geejay50

VOC Duits , a Challenge to Numismatists

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geejay50

Dear Collectors,

The issue of small currency shortage in the Cape of the VOC is well known and well presented by Engelbrecht (Money in South Africa pp26) and Scholten (The Coins of the Dutch Overseas Territories 1601-1948 pp66-69).

Scholten makes it clear that "the Duits and Half Duits  struck at (the Mint) at Enkhuizen in 1802.....were primarily intended for the Cape of Good Hope "  The value indicated of 5-1-16-G for the Duits and 5-1-32- G for the Half Duits  on the Obverse is not well understood by many. In the case of the Duit, it means to indicate the exchange rate of 5 Duits to One Sixteenth of a Silver Gulden or what amounts to 80 Duits to the Gulden and 160 Half Duits.

Scholten in Pg 69 mentions that this was an undervaluation and a mistake and the inscription should have been 6-1/16-G because the silver Gulden was valued at more in the Indies i.e.96 Duits. This mistake on the Duits was however continued till 1826. It also delayed the release of these Duits until 1804 with the great scarcity of small change giving impetus.

We must give a place to these humble copper coins alongside the very popular and pricy 'Ship's Guilders' and fractions. Engelbrecht states on pg 26 "Copper from the east often appeared at the Cape" and has a pic of a Half Duit alongside the Guilders.

The variety of different Duits and Half Duits is staggering. I had the good fortune to buy a batch of raw worn looking coins at an overseas auction which lay in my collection for a long time unattended.

I will here give space to some of the variety and the background to some of them (there were many dies used- giving differences). The Mints used were Enkhuizen (mintmark star) , Kampen in the province of Overyssel and the town of Utrecht in my pics but there many others. In the case of Kampen, the heraldic eagle seen on the coin is the mintmark of the Overyssel mintmaster  N. Wonneman who had the contract to make the coins.The inscription "VIGILATE ET ORATE' means "Watch and Pray" and the Overyssel indication is the Rampant Eagle facing left with a wavy line at the middle.  Schonken comments that the quality of these coins were of poor quality because the work was done as cheaply as possible by the lowest bidder and "provincial mintmasters ..had no work at the time"sic . There is only one of these 1804 Overyssel  Duits graded by NGC (MS62BN).

The Stad Utrecht Duit from 1739 comes from the Shipwreck of the Visch , wrecked in 1740 at Green Point Cape Town. The "K" Mark in the 1815 Duit refers to Sumatra , one of the Islands in Indonesia. NGC has graded one of these as VF20.

This posting is but a small attempt to give a start to some understanding of these coins. They are not of big value but being copper are seldom seen in states that avoid environmental damage . I would appreciate any input from others.

Geejay

 

1804-16 NEI Duits Enkhuizen Mint  (1).jpg

1804-16 NEI Duits Enkhuizen Mint  (2).jpg

1803-4 NEI Duits Kampen Overyssel  (1).jpg

1803-4 NEI Duits Kampen Overyssel  (2).jpg

1804 NEI Overyssel Duit MS62BN  (1).jpg

1805 Batavian Republic One Sixteenth Gulden Duit KM100Rev.jpg

1805 Batavian Republic One Sixteenth Gulden Duit KM100 Obv.jpg

1805 Batavian Republic One Thirty Second Gulden Rev.jpg

1805 Batavian Republic One Thirty Second Gulden.Obv.jpg

1806 NEI Holland Half Duit MS61BN.jpg

1815 NEI Sumatra Duit  (1).jpg

1815 NEI Sumatra Duit  (2).jpg

1739 Stad Utrecht Duit  (1) - Copy.jpg

1739 Stad Utrecht Duit  (2) - Copy.jpg

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geejay50

The above posting should be headed "The Duits of the Netherlands East Indies (including the Cape) "

The VOC had expired by 1799 under decay and the political events that spilled over to the Netherlands the French Revolution (1795) and led to the Batavian Republic which ruled from 1789 to 1807. The inscription was carried on those Duits therefore .

The VOC Duits dated from the VOC period prior to Batavian Republic and are hard to find in uncorroded gradable condition. 

The different Provinces of Holland,Gelderland, Westfrisia and Zeeland minted Copper Duits and Mint Marks referring to mintmasters were carried and many varieties exist

Here follows a few examples , the 1755 VOC Duit NGC AU55 is a Scarce coin according to Scholten and only one has been graded thus far. It bears a lovely original purplish sheen and one can be proud to have such a coin in one's collection.

The 1752 Zeeland Duit (S177a carries the Mintmark of a Tower between two 6 pointed Stars above the VOC. It still has areas of original patina on the obverse.

Geejay

 

1755 VOC Copper Duit Hollandia AU58 Logo S101 Scarce (1).jpg

1755 VOC Copper Duit Hollandia AU58 Logo S101 Scarce (2).jpg

1755 VOC Copper Duit Hollandia AU58 Logo S101 Scarce (3).jpg

1752 VOC Duit S177a mm Tower between 2 6ptd stars.jpg

1752 VOC Duit Zeeland S177a mm Tower between 2 6pointed stars.jpg

1747 VOC Duit S172a Small 4 mm as in S177a (1).jpg

1752 VOC Duit Zeeland S177a mm Tower between 2 6pointed stars.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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