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unicoin

coin collection plus coin albums for buy now

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unicoin

Good evening all,

I want to sell everything I have about coins on one buy now add.   One coin album  with coins.  Some loose coins.

Two older coin books. I want to post it on one post with pictures. There are many picture from all different

kind of coins.   How do I go about it.   I cannot upload all of the pictures and cannot sell without buyers can

look at it.   Please help.

Thanks

Andrea from unicoin

 

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GROOVIE COINS
1 hour ago, unicoin said:

Good evening all,

I want to sell everything I have about coins on one buy now add.   One coin album  with coins.  Some loose coins.

Two older coin books. I want to post it on one post with pictures. There are many picture from all different

kind of coins.   How do I go about it.   I cannot upload all of the pictures and cannot sell without buyers can

look at it.   Please help.

Thanks

Andrea from unicoin

 

Good day

Don't you think it's best to put it on auction where many bidders can compete?  If it's a urgent sale, a buy now listing could take very long and we are approaching Christmas where people's attentions will be on the holidays. 

Also with auction listings you can choose to delete bidders who are time wasters (as their ratings will show) so you are more guaranteed to get genuine sale. With Buy now listings, anybody with poor ratings can buy, and keep your listing in limbo while you hope for payment (SNC normally take over a week to finalize).

Pierre gave quite a few sellers tips to selling coins in your last post "1893 Half Pound

Keep in mind you are against time because many sellers have not renewed their listings as the festive season is already upon us. 

An alternative to selling the collection yourself would be to approach a dealer (like Pierre or Morne) and either have them sell it on your behalf for a commission, or sell it to them if they willing to buy.

regards Robert

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jwither

I understood from her prior post on the 1893 1/2 pond that she either works for or owns a coin shop.  Her description indicates that she is trying to sell a large number of coins or bulk lot simultaneously here on BoB, not somewhere else.  If both are correct, I suspect it isn't worth the time to list the coins individually, whether for her or any other dealer.

I know I wouldn't bother with it.

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GROOVIE COINS
8 hours ago, jwither said:

I understood from her prior post on the 1893 1/2 pond that she either works for or owns a coin shop.  Her description indicates that she is trying to sell a large number of coins or bulk lot simultaneously here on BoB, not somewhere else.  If both are correct, I suspect it isn't worth the time to list the coins individually, whether for her or any other dealer.

I know I wouldn't bother with it.

There are many that put up bulk buys on auction, that fetch lack lustre prices. But if the need persists and time is constrained, then I suppose there is no other alternative.

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jwither
12 hours ago, GROOVIE MOVIES said:

There are many that put up bulk buys on auction, that fetch lack lustre prices. But if the need persists and time is constrained, then I suppose there is no other alternative.

Pure guess on my part but I suspect it isn't due to time constraints or necessity.  It is a matter of minimizing inconvenience.

It's hard to provide specifics without knowing exactly what is in the group lot, but it's probably what I would describe as "unsellable", at least from a "retail" aspect.  Bulk lots of common low to average quality coins sell at noticeable to massive discounts to "retail" because most collectors don't really want it anymore. 

It also isn't worth the dealer's time to sort through it to try to sell at "retail".  This material might have a retail value of R2, R5 or $1 USD but the dealer may offer 10% OR 20% of that if they want it at all.  This is also true of more valuable coins in some instances.

In the USA, I have read that retail dealers can wholesale bulk common "world" coinage (even average to decent quality) and common circulated US "classics" (the coinage in circulation immediately prior to 1965 when base metal replaced silver).  The us silver coinage probably gets sent to refiners for melting or sold to financial buyers (aka, "investors") who buy "junk" coin silver by the roll, bag or FV increments of $100 to $1000 USD.  The US base metal coinage and world coinage, I don't know.  Some of it might get dumped onto unsuspecting non-collectors through marketing campaigns (like the ones you might see in a magazine) or end up in a dealer "junk" bin.

In the USA, dealers frequently get stuck with it when buying what they actually want from a walk-in customer or estate.  These sellers might have a few good or decent coins the dealer wants but most of it they don't.

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GROOVIE COINS
10 hours ago, jwither said:

Pure guess on my part but I suspect it isn't due to time constraints or necessity.  It is a matter of minimizing inconvenience.

It's hard to provide specifics without knowing exactly what is in the group lot, but it's probably what I would describe as "unsellable", at least from a "retail" aspect.  Bulk lots of common low to average quality coins sell at noticeable to massive discounts to "retail" because most collectors don't really want it anymore. 

It also isn't worth the dealer's time to sort through it to try to sell at "retail".  This material might have a retail value of R2, R5 or $1 USD but the dealer may offer 10% OR 20% of that if they want it at all.  This is also true of more valuable coins in some instances.

In the USA, I have read that retail dealers can wholesale bulk common "world" coinage (even average to decent quality) and common circulated US "classics" (the coinage in circulation immediately prior to 1965 when base metal replaced silver).  The us silver coinage probably gets sent to refiners for melting or sold to financial buyers (aka, "investors") who buy "junk" coin silver by the roll, bag or FV increments of $100 to $1000 USD.  The US base metal coinage and world coinage, I don't know.  Some of it might get dumped onto unsuspecting non-collectors through marketing campaigns (like the ones you might see in a magazine) or end up in a dealer "junk" bin.

In the USA, dealers frequently get stuck with it when buying what they actually want from a walk-in customer or estate.  These sellers might have a few good or decent coins the dealer wants but most of it they don't.

How has the quarter state series been doing with regards to finding its way to unwanted baskets and bulk buys? I would think they would commonly find their way to junk bins or garage sales, just by sheer volumes in collections that were put together? I read it's the most successful coin collection series in history of numismatics with hundreds of millions of coins minted and collected. I myself came across a few of them and held on to them. It's a great way to market the US with their key attractions and historical facts.

regards Robert

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unicoin

I am not a business I am private and never bought coins.    I just do not collect anymore.

 

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jwither
5 hours ago, GROOVIE MOVIES said:

How has the quarter state series been doing with regards to finding its way to unwanted baskets and bulk buys? I would think they would commonly find their way to junk bins or garage sales, just by sheer volumes in collections that were put together? I read it's the most successful coin collection series in history of numismatics with hundreds of millions of coins minted and collected. I myself came across a few of them and held on to them. It's a great way to market the US with their key attractions and historical facts.

regards Robert

I don't really know and can only speculate.  Back around 2000 a few years after I resumed collecting, I bought a few of the proof sets from the US Mint and made a weak effort to find the coins from circulation, but quickly lost interest and later sold what I bought.

I don't believe State Quarters (SQ) end up in dealer "junk" bins at all but then, the last dealer shop I visited was in 2016 and only to sell bullion.  This dealer is a PNG member and doesn't sell the lowest priced coins.

If the coin is a better one (at minimum equivalent to MS-65 maybe), some dealers probably sell it as singles.   On eBay, the last time I checked, one sold (don't remember exactly which one) for between $2 and $3 USD as an NGC MS-67.  That's right, less than the grading fee.  The price variance proportionately is really wide, even though the series is widely collected and "popular".  The highest price for an MS-67 (PCGS) was around $50.

It's my opinion that these coins exist by the millions in higher MS eligible grades, each and every one of the 100 different circulation strikes.  Larger quantities probably get wholesaled to a dealer like Littleton who mostly markets sets (including this one) to noncollectors at substantial proportional premiums.  Some per above also sold as singles, whether by dealers or on eBay.  Otherwise, put back into circulation.

I agree it was the most successful program in history, but don't know how much it did to increase the collector base.  Most who collected did so at FV and it's evident they aren't collecting anymore.  It's my opinion that those who started with it currently buy (world) NCLT and higher quality lower to medium priced coinage generically, whether US or otherwise.  An example would be the current US preference for certain toned coins.

I don't know how "popular" (as in the size of the collector base) the series is now but I'd say even after only 10 years since it ended, not very measured by the number paying any noticeable premium.  The TPG population reports demonstrate there is a limited following (relative to the US collector base) which is large but it certainly is one of the least preferred series in US coinage.

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