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Pinkx

Southern Africa Tokens

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Pinkx

Thanks Edgey. Great Story.

For future expiditions that you may have planned, I would also like to suggest that you search for tokens from Oldfield High Flats (Ixopo) and C. Downes (Blood River). ;)

regards

Stephen van Niekerk

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Pierre_Henri

Good Grief ...

 

I went on a very long and eventful trip into the interior armed with two metal detectors ...

 

Well, well , well...

 

We have been communicating for so long and I never knew you are also a metal detecting fan!

 

I have been the editor of the South African Metal Detecting Newsletter "Treasure Talk" for many years and thought I knew all the hobbiests!

 

Mike Conradie from Durban and myself are thinking of starting up the newsletter again. I stopped it after SANTAM, SA's biggest short term insurer waved its sponsorship of our newsletter a few years ago.

 

Someone mentioned some Prison tokens - we once went on a metal detecting trip to a ghost town near Garies in the Namakwaland and founsd some interesting items near the ruines of an old prison there.

 

It was me, Peter Stoklas from the Chezh Republic, Wolfgang Roux from Minelab (he was a Fisher agent then) and Andy Naude (one of our prmier underwater detectorists who I have been treasure diving with on the FAME (1822)

 

This bring back so many wonderful stories I must scratch around in my newsletters and post a few pictures !

 

Kind regards

 

Pierre

 

 

 

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EdgeyDragon

Where to start!

 

Hi

Best I tackle this from the beginning!

Scott, you are most welcome to put my ramblings on your site! And we are now in communication to sort that and pics out, so even better! I also want to state publicly that I (and I am sure others) would like to thank you for your hard work on the token subject. It has opened a vast world up for many of us!

I am sure with the help of this very topic on BoB some further interesting things may come to light that shall help this topic grow even more!

 

Only thing I did notice on re-reading my post is the odd gramatical error! Ooops sorry!

:)

I shall revisit St. Faith sometime soon and see if I can't find that elusive church!

Thank you Pinkx for the hints on further expeditions! The Ixopo I was aware off from Scotts work and the wonderful map of that area. Blood river however shall get some investigation! So thank you!

 

I recently went to Ermelo on a similar mission, but didn't find any coins or tokens. I did however find an old Rationing Weight used by the English Soldiers during the Boer War, so I was not unhappy with the venture! A good Sun Tan was found there too! :D

 

Pierre :) do you really think I bought all those tokens off you just because I like them???? hahahaha! Its only because I havent been able to find any myself yet! hahaha! :D (actually in all honesty Pierre, your coins a fantastic!)

 

I would love to recieve your newsletter if you start it up again! And yes post some pics! (If thats ok with Pinkx, seeing as how you (pinkx) started the thread and its becoming a wild untamed beast... I hope you are ok with us chatting about these off shoot subjects?)

Does anyone want to see my Rationing Weight? lol

Actually before I get in trouble for false advertising... its only half of a Ration Weight. So eventually someone will find the other half! :cool:

Regards

edgeydragon

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Guest Guest

Hi Paul

 

Thank you and have added your fascinating story to my web page ("You Say")

 

At the bottom of this page you will find an email from John Royston's great, great grandson - Simon Royston. If you are interested in speaking to him about St Faiths let me know and I will give you his personal email address.

 

My understanding is that Simon is still involved directly with Royston House near Port Shepstone.

 

Kind regards

 

Scott Balson

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Pinkx

"I would love to recieve your newsletter if you start it up again! And yes post some pics! (If thats ok with Pinkx, seeing as how you (pinkx) started the thread and its becoming a wild untamed beast... I hope you are ok with us chatting about these off shoot subjects?) "

 

I have no problem with anyone posting any information that adds value to, and stimulates, token collecting. Any additional knowledge gained about our token history is valuable - the locations, the people and all the stories. That's what makes token collecting so fascinating

 

regards

Stephen van Niekerk

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Gecko Coins

Hi

 

Wanted to share this one with you as well, it's a 2/- token for T.P. Staples dated 1900.

 

"He constructed the line between Modderspoort and Ladybrand, 80 miles East of Bloemfontein, where his firm was based"

 

[ATTACH]464[/ATTACH]

IMG_5971.JPG.945691eb421cde47dde0d795be2e3949.JPG

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Poems written about South African tokens

 

On a very different note... well known numismatist's poems on South African tokens... taken from my website:

 

Allyn Jacobs* on the Frances Charlotte Larkan token (East Griqualand):

Dung-besmattered though they be,

The Larkans are a joy to see!

Staffords with their backsides etched,

Reek of mielies that were retched....

Long years they mouldered in latrine,

And but for you were never seen!

 

*Allyn has the finest collection of South African tokens in the world.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Rege James Podroza* (USA) - Strachan and Co (Kence) (East Griqualand):

 

The brass discs around his neck

Made a jangling sound

Cadenced as his calloused feet

Struck the dusty ground

 

Running down from Kokstad

Along to Strachan`s store

To trade them in for maize and cloth

Tobacco, sugar, more!

 

"Kence" the money of the Griquas

Passed from hand to hand

Legal tender for all debts

Incurred in Nomansland

 

And what an empire Strachan built

On his brass token coins

From Mountain Home to Umzimkulu

They graced the people's loins.

 

Fifty years they traveled round

For whatever was bought and sold

The tokens of Strachan`s store…

Redeemed as good as gold!

 

Today they turn up now and then

Uncommon and quite rare

Strachan's tokens of East Griqualand

The money once used there!

 

*Rege hunts big game in Africa and has published a great table book of poems on his hunting expeditions.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Milner Snell*, Chair of the Kokstad Museum, on James Cole (East Griqualand):

Pockmarked pieces of metal

minted by the king

knotted in handkerchiefs

and strung on string

spent in stores

dusty and dark

when the wool has been sheared

and the mealies are ripe.

 

*Milner lives in Kokstad and has several published books on the region's early history.

 

Enjoy

 

Would be interested if any other collectors have poetic verse to add...

 

Kind regards

 

 

Scott Balson

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Pinkx

Key reward tokens - for Weetam (part 1)

 

Here is the bulk of the key reward tokens in my collection.

 

Like Weetam, I too would be interested to see what other collectors have. One of the pieces not shown (not in such good condition is a 2/6 reward tag from Beaufort West labelled "Upper Donkin Street"

58f5a71b16914_benefitkeyregistryandunionassurance.JPG.feda472bdd44a9197059b12cf264f8fa.JPG

58f5a71b1c9e8_early2s_and_6d_reward_tags.JPG.2c0515f336bf81ed29fcb6cf1e1e2adc.JPG

58f5a71b21d1b_GeneralPostOffice.JPG.4d713dcdcab4ba6273e942bbd15edc7b.JPG

58f5a71b27823_KeytoriaSANatKeyRegistrySARailways.JPG.77bf94ebe87cd03b8aa0cbbfa7d3fc5f.JPG

Private_key_tags.JPG.e9b342d89d11a47b952c132f4506e61d.JPG

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Pinkx

Key reward tag - for Weetam (part 2)

 

I have seen very few of this type of key tag around.

 

Stephen van Niekerk

58f5a71b32676_Rewardguarenteed.JPG.bdf14217ff054fcfa4aa7881ac610f19.JPG

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Guest Guest

Hi Pierre, Stephen

 

Personally, I have no interest in "reward tokens" as they are not token coins issued for use in general trade but only tokens with a "reward value" collected in the unique circumstance the item attached to it is lost and the finder hands it in to collect the reward. The issue I have is that they only have a value when the primary item they are attached to is lost. I know this is a grey area but I find it hard to justify these pieces as token coins.

 

I tend to see things in black and white and the challenge of getting those many elusive pieces still out there that meet my "blinkered" criteria keeps me happy!

 

Kind regards

 

 

Scott Balson

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Durban Club 6d UPDATE...

 

Lovely to see a Durban Club 6d for sale on BoB.

 

They are one of a handful of really prized South African tokens - thanks to their rich history.

 

Tokens - Durban Club 6d Type 1 for sale in Johannesburg

 

I am watching this coin with interest. I already have two complete sets of the three varieties but have never seen a holed piece before.

 

Unlike the rural trade coins of Strachan, James Cole, Larkan et al their market was the upper echilons of the Colonial ladder in Durban - and their "owners" would have had pockets!

 

Kind regards

 

Scott Balson

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Thanks BoB

 

Checking the token listings is a pleasure now. There are only a handful of incorrectly placed bicycle licences, replica coins, brooches and badges left listed under tokens (hopefully these will soon find another home).

 

I would rather see 100 valid token coins under this category than 500 items which are totally misplaced here.

 

Kind regards

 

 

Scott Balson

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Pinkx

Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry Tokens

 

History of the Cornwall Light Infantry (from Wikipedia)

 

The Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry (DCLI) was an infantry of the British army created on 1 July 1888 by merging the 32nd (Cornwall Light Infantry) Regiment of Foot and the 46th (South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot. The DCLI also incorporated the militia and rifle volunteers of Cornwall.

 

The 32nd Regiment of foot became the 1st Battalion, and the 46th Regiment of Foot the 2nd Battalion of the DCLI.

 

Cornwall Light Infantry in South Africa (from Wikipedia)

 

In October 1899 war broke out between the United Kingdom and the Boer Republic. The 2nd Battalion arrived in South Africa in the following month, where they took part in minor actions on the western border of the Cape Colony. In February 1900 they became part of the 19th Brigade. They entered action against the Boers at Paardeburg, and in March 1900 entered Bloemfontein. They continued to take part in a series of skirmishes until the end of the war.

 

Following the end of the Boer war, the 2nd Battalion returned to England in 1902 until 1905. Thereafter, the 2nd Battalion was based in Gibraltar (1905 to 1907), Bermuda (1907 to 1910) and again back in South Africa (1910 to 1913).

 

The 1st Battalion took no part on the war, moving from India to Ceylon in 1900 where they guarded South African prisoners of war. Following the end of the Boer war, the 1st Battalion was based in South Africa (1902 to 1906), England (1906 to 1913) and Ireland (1913 to 1914).

 

The Arms of Cornwall (from Cornwallinfocus.co.uk)

 

The Arms of Cornwall depict a black shield containing 15 gold balls - known as besants. The history of the besants is that they were gold coins found in Byzantium. The legend being, that an Earl of Cornwall fighting in the Crusades in the 12th Century, was captured by the Saracens. The people of Cornwall ('One And All') had to raise the sum of 15 besants to ensure his safe release.

 

The Arms of Cornwall are depicted on the Cornwall Light Infantry tokens.

 

Interestingly, my old school - St Stithians College (in Johannesburg) – that was originally founded by two Cornishmen, has the motto “One and All” and the 15 besants in the school badge. I remember learning about our school’s history as part of our standard 6 school induction process, but only recently made the connection to the Cornwall Light Infantry tokens when I counted the 15 besants.

 

Cornwall Light Infantry Tokens

 

Two types of DCLI tokens are known. From the attached image, the difference between the two types can be seen.

 

Type 1: Coin struck, thick “1”, fatter shield, larger besants and five petalled florettes

 

Type 2: Medal struck, slender “1”, slender shield, smaller besants and six petalled florettes.

 

The tokens are thought to be canteen tokens, and used during the boer war period. It is unknown whether the tokens were specifically used only during the Boer war or if they were used eleswhere wherever the DCLI was based.

58f5a71b386aa_DCLItokens_opt.jpg.7ea06602cdbde380297f8d8a7b3be9bf.jpg

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Pinkx

Sharman’s and Erasmus Bus Services - Part 1

 

James Smith who is the co-author of “South African Trolley Buses” - a book that is currently in the final stages of production - has kindly provided me with a copy of “The Origin and Development of Passenger Carrying Transport in and around Pretoria”. Thank you James, I am sure this information is much appreciated by many token collectors out there …

 

This document was prepared by Mr. H.S. Cuthill in the late 1950’s who was then a Transport Superintendent at the Pretoria City Transport Department. The following text is taken from the document:

 

“The first types of motor driven buses to appear on the roads were constructed almost identically to the old horse buses, and were almost as high off the ground. They also had two seats facing each other and could seat twelve passengers, with two more next to the driver in the front. These busses were by no means weather proof as, instead of windows, the sides could only be closed with a canvas flap which could fold down on the outside when it rained or blew too fiercely, but in cold weather the passengers just froze.

 

These busses were licensed to carry 14 passengers, but it was more the rule than the exception to carry upwards of 30! Passengers stood on the running boards, back steps, and even sat on the mudguards. I often think of those days and compare them with the present time, both from the passengers’ and drivers’ point of view. The passengers of those days were a much more congenial body of people than those of today, and accepted the inconvenience of having to stand for a few minutes with a smile and a ready joke, and were always prepared to move up and make room so that just one more person could squeeze on, and they could all get to town.

 

The bus drivers received 10/- per day as wages, and worked from 6.00 a.m. until 7.00 p.m. daily, and every second day until 11.00 p.m. Each one got an allowance of 3/- for lunch, morning tea and afternoon tea, which had to be taken between trips. There was no such thing as a ‘relief’ driver for meals, no overtime, nor days off, neither were uniforms nor clothes of any description supplied. The men worked seven days a week, did their own running repairs, kept the fuel tanks filled, oil level in engine checked, battery checked etc., etc. Such were the conditions under which a bus driver labored in those days, and from the ranks of those same drivers are a number of men who became the backbone of the present City Transport Department, not only as drivers and Inspectors, but also has higher executives! Which to the reader should go to prove that hard work under difficult conditions, has never yet killed anyone?

 

The pioneers of the motor bus operators in the Moot area were the following:-

 

1. In 1919 a Mr. McVittie started a service from the corner of 18th Avenue and Frederika Street, via Voortrekker Road, into Pretoria. He was one of those hardy types who didn’t put much trust in either man or machine. One day a lady passenger tore her dress on a nail in the bus and complained to him about it, but all the satisfaction she got was “What more do you want for a sixpence?” Mr. McVitte started this service with an old ex-1918 Army Thorneycroft bus which had solid tyres, and acted as a good liver-shaker, as well as a means of transport.

 

2. The next to appear on the same route were Messrs. Wilson and Wheatlan, during 1920. They had a Bedford bus of almost the same vintage as their predecessor, except that it shook perhaps a trifle more.

 

3. They in turn were followed by a Mr. Marais, who started off with the latest type of Ford bus, which was the three-pedal type, and was more comfortable to ride in.

 

4. Then came Mr. Sharman, in 1921, a man whose name must still be remembered by many a Pretorian. He started off with two very old ex-Army Leyland buses, which had solid tyres, but these he soon disposed of and replaced them with two Dodge buses, with a load capacity of 14, but here again this should have been given as a minimum load, because they too frequently carried upwards of 30 passengers.

 

Mr. Sharman then extended the route to Villieria, to run via 30th Avenue, Ben Swart Street, 24th Avenue, and Michael Brink Street to 18th Avenue, along Frederika Street and into Voortrekker Road to town. The terminus was at the corner of Vermeulen and Andries Streets.

 

Later Mr. Sharman opened up another route from Villieria, via Hertzog Street and 18th Avenue into Frederika Street, and thence along the same route as previously given. The fares on these routes were 6d cash between the hours of 6.00 am and 7.00 pm thereafter the fare was 1/- cash. On Sundays and holidays the fare was 1/- cash.

 

Mr. Sharman ran these services for many years, and kept abreast of the times by building (himself) bigger and better bus bodies, altering the design from the old types with entrance doors at the rear, to those with side entrance next to the driver, and creating a regular half-hour service 6.00 am to 6.00 pm daily. When faced with “peak” demand, his wife came to the rescue and drove a bus as well as the rest of us!! It would be fitting at this stage to pay tribute to Mrs. Sharman who must truly be recognized as one of the pioneers of transport undertakings in her day. Not only did she drive a bus, but it was she who did all the accounts, over and above running a home and family very successfully. Bravo, Mrs. Sharman.

 

It was about this time that the “Pirates” started operating. There was no Road Transportation Board in existence and anyone who could afford to buy a bus, and thought he might be able to ‘Run the other service off the road’ started an opposition service, usually on an established route, and so a minor ‘war’ developed, often ending in a ‘free for all’ fight, which not only involved the personnel, but the vehicles themselves were used to ‘cut’ one or the other off the road, invariably ending with one or other of the combatant bus services retiring bruised, damaged and sadly out of pocket. Often the ‘defeated’ services would start again somewhere else, most times on a new route.

 

Some of the tactics used by opposing services were (a) to ‘pilot’ the opposition with a bus running about five minutes ahead of it, and (b) tying the branch of a tree behind the bus, which made so much dust that the following bus just could not keep going, and when the air was once again clear and visibility normal – Heigh ho – no passengers!

 

A service was developed by a Mr. Erasmus in 1919 – ‘Ou Rassie’ as he affectionately known to all who travelled in his buses for many years – which ran from Wonderboomsuid School, via 12th Avenue into 2nd Street (now Jacob Street) then into Voortrekker Road, Beatrix Street, Church Street and Andries Street, with the terminus at the corner of Vermeulen and Andries Streets. Later he opened up another route, starting from Naude Street, and running into town via Voortrekker Road.

 

Mr. Erasmus started off using Ford Buses, but later added Dodge and Reo buses as his fleet increased. The fares on this undertaking were exactly the same as on the route operated by Mr. Sharman, namely 6d cash from 6.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. and thereafter 1/- cash.

 

Both these services were doing well and extending with the development taking place in the Moot, but with the incorporation of the Innesdale Municipality into Pretoria (October 1931 - Ed), the private bus concerns were swallowed up and their services taken over by the Pretoria City Transport Department. Compensation was paid to the operators of these fleets by the Pretoria City Council when the fleets were taken over. Who knows they might still be operating at a profit, and paying their way, had incorporation never taken place.”

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Pinkx

Sharman’s and Erasmus Bus Services - Part 2

 

Known tokens for Sharman and Erasmus Bus Services

 

Hern’s token catalogue lists various varieties of the 6d and 3d tokens in brass and aluminum, with and without a central hole, for both the Sharman and Erasmus Bus Services. The two issues are very similar to each other and presumably manufactured by the same supplier.

 

There is no reference in the above mentioned document of a 3d fare – logic would suggest that this was a half-price fare especially for children (as was typically the practice of busses and trams operating during this time).

 

Presuming also that bus operators issued change in token, this would have alleviated the need for carrying small change, but it would also have forced passengers to continue using the services of their token supplier instead of other operators or any of the ‘Pirate’ services.

 

Images of the tokens

 

Unfortunately I do not have any of these tokens in my collection to show off. During my early token collecting days, I was fortunate to acquire a Sharman’s and an Erasmus piece, but not knowing their true scarcity and value I traded them for other tokens that I was more interested in at the time. These two tokens sparked my interest token collecting and I therefore have no regrets, and oneday I hope to have them back in my collection again.

 

Cheers

Stephen van Niekerk

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Guest Guest

Thanks BoB

 

It is so good to see the tokens category so much more relevant - less than 100 listings BUT, apart from a few medals and badges, the rest are tokens and make life so much easier!!

 

Kind regards

 

Scott Balson

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weetam
Here is the bulk of the key reward tokens in my collection.

 

Like Weetam, I too would be interested to see what other collectors have. One of the pieces not shown (not in such good condition is a 2/6 reward tag from Beaufort West labelled "Upper Donkin Street"

 

Many thanks for posting these pictures , with your permission I would like to add them to my web site -

 

 

and of course I am always looking for items like to add to my collection

 

John

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Pinkx

Key Reward Tokens

 

Hi John

No problem. You are welcome to post them on your website.

regards

Steve

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Pinkx

Stars and Stripes Hotel, Fordsburg, Johannesburg

 

Stars and Stripes Hotel, Fordsburg

 

The old building that once was the Stars and Stripes Hotel, located in Fordsburg (Johannesburg) on the corner of Lilian and May Roads, is still there today – although now it has a noticeable pink complexion.

 

 

Token of the Stars and Stripes Hotel

 

Dr. Theron (Tokens of Southern Africa and their History, August 1978) mentions under the T.9. Blackings Restaurant reference:

 

“(As a matter of interest I may mention here that Mr. Rule that day also told me of another Johannesburg token which I have so far not encountered. It was a celluloid uniface 6d token used as a billiard token at the Stars and Stripes Hotel c/o Avenue and May Roads, Fordsburg, Johannesburg. Was also used about 1903.)”

 

As per Hern’s 2009 token catalogue, a number of these tokens for the Stars and Stripes Hotel have since been discovered, and the token is in fact made of brass, with a diameter of 26.3 mm and thickness of 1.4 mm (see photo attached).

 

 

Early History of the Stars and Stripes Hotel

 

I have not managed to find out any information relating to the early history of this hotel – so any information from others would be much appreciated.

 

I therefore cannot confirm that the Stars and Stripes Hotel was in existence in 1903.

 

 

Early Development of Fordsburg

(Source- White, poor and angry: white working class families in Johannesburg, by Lis Lange, Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2003)

 

Fordsburg was originally laid out as a residential area for white miners and artisans in 1888 by the Ford & Jeppe Estate Company - the miners and artisans all working at the nearby mines or in various support industries. Another development, also in 1888, by the same Ford & Jeppe Estate Company – Jeppestown – was intended for a wealthier group of residents/owners. With the ever increasing population of miners in Johannesburg requiring accommodation, the success of hotels in Fordsburg was virtually assured. Lack of accommodation and high rents in the more affluent areas of Johannesburg created the opportunity for hotels (and boarding houses) that were cheaper than renting a house. In the early 1900’s, house rentals cost anything from £9 to £15 per month, whereas board and lodging at a hotel was typically £6 per month. The average wage for a skilled worker at the time was £20 a month.

 

As a result, Fordsburg flourished and soon this community became a volatile mixture of nationalities, languages and colours (Afrikaaner, British, Irish, American, Australian, Italian, Montenegrin (Yugoslavian) etc.), and a distinctive language flourished among the residents. A section of Fordsburg also become part of Johannesburg’s largest slum – Brickfields/Burghersdorp - with Poor White, Black, Indian and Malay Locations. Illicit liquor selling and prostitution thrived within the slums, the poor mining communities and the surrounding areas.

 

Many of the white miners and artisans of Fordsburg joined the strike of 1913, and it was here on the Fordsburg Market Square (where the Unions had their headquarters) that the battle of Fordsburg ended the Rand Revolt of 1922. The Stars and Stripes Hotel would literally have been a few blocks away from the scene of the fight, and presumably managed to escape undamaged (unlike Rose’s Building on the corner of Mint Road and Commercial Street – which faced the Union Headquarters – and suffered heavy damage).

 

 

Later History of the Stars and Stripes Hotel

 

Mr. Ken Hanna (born in 1935), whose family once owned the Stars and Stripes Hotel, was kind enough to share his early childhood memories with me, namely:

  • Ken’s parents originally farmed in the Muldersdrift area, and following a period of prolonged drought sometime in the 1920’s, moved to Ferreirasdorp where they then worked in the fresh produce market of Newtown - now the home of the Market Theatre and Museum Africa. [The name ‘Newtown’ was adopted by city administrators in 1904 following the clearance of Brickfields and other multi-racial 'slums' in Johannesburg’s first forced removal.]
  • In 1936, Father Peter Alam purchased the Dutch Reform Church (on 61 Mint Road) for the Lebanese Maronite community, and formed the Maronite Church of Our Lady of Lebanon.
  • Soon thereafter, Ken’s grandparents, settled at 47 Mint Road to be close to their church – resulting in the Hanna family gravitating to the Fordsburg area.
  • In 1939, Ken’s father - Richard Kahlil Hannah - bought the Stars and Stripes Hotel for the total sum of £ 4,000. The hotel being 5 blocks away from Ken’s grandparents on Mint Road.
  • Richard Hanna then converted part of the hotel into residential quarters and rented these out (these single storey quarters are still rented out today – see photo).
  • The main hotel building had a billiard saloon on the ground floor, and the upstairs area of the hotel building was the living area for the Hannah family (see photo).
  • The backyard of the hotel was planted with fruit trees and vegetable gardens, and there were communal ablution facilities.
  • Lodgers at the hotel were as mixed and varied as the surrounding community of Fordsburg.
  • Some of the more memorable members of the community were the Chinese lady who ran the nearby corner shop, a poor Jewish couple who received charity from “Helping Hands”, the resident Colored prostit*te and “Aunt Minnie” – a Colored woman living with a White man.
  • There were also the local illicit liquor sellers who (with the assistance of some of the neighbourhood residents) were always on the lookout for the police and liquor license inspectors – hiding their stock to avoid arrest and prosecution.
  • Passes had to be arranged for all the non-White staff who worked at the hotel, thereby allowing them to continue working at the hotel and avoid arrest by the local police.
  • In 1947, when Richard Kahlil Hannah passed away , the hotel was sold for the sum of £ 9,000.

Images Attached

1. Stars and Stripes Hotel Token

2. Stars and Stripes Hotel – 1988 (photo taken by Ken Hanna)

3. Stars and Stripes Hotel – 2010 (photo showing residential quarters)

4. Stars and Stripes Hotel – 2010 (photo showing main building – billiard saloon was on the ground floor and the living quarters upstairs)

Cheers

Steve van Niekerk

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58f5a71c187b6_StarsandStripesHotel1988.jpg.4a8b6f2f857970cb866432bd183b6277.jpg

58f5a71c23c2f_StarsandStripesHotel2010-mainbuilding.jpg.ce3727001a60fd28b6f590b378b08712.jpg

58f5a71c2f522_StarsandStripesHotel2010-residences.jpg.e6b72dd64b591ccfae2aa0374408e82c.jpg

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Staffords Post 3d

 

In October 2004 well known token coin collector Allyn Jacobs wrote an email to me in which he said “Now all I need is a Stafford”. He was referring to the elusive trading tokens issued by Charles Stafford in about the 1880s.

 

Charles Stafford’s English father, Edward, was one of the first traders to cater for the Griqua after their flight across the infamous Ongeluksnek in the late 1860s. He had a small trading store at their Mount Currie settlement and was one of the first two traders (the other Wildridge) who set up business in 1872 in the deserted village of Kokstad. Despite all efforts the Griqua remained at their cold Mount Currie settlement until Adam Kok III forced his people off the cold mountain slopes and down to Kokstad in 1874.

 

In the mid 1870s Stafford set up a remote but well positioned trading post on the main wagon road from Kokstad to Umzimkhulu in a region known as Rietvlei (the name remains today). The trading post did a flourishing trade with the natives and passing ox wagons.

 

Rietvlei in 2006 - I took this pic while travelling to Kokstad: http://images.bidorbuy.co.za/user_images/949/1443949_100626034245_007.jpg

 

It was at Rietvlei that the notorious Smith Pommer and Griqua outlaw Muis Kok roamed the banks of the Ibisi River in the mid 1870s with their growing band of rebel followers. The outspoken Pommer had continuously been in conflict with the common sense approach of the Griqua Secretary, Brisley (of Strachan and Co fame) while Muis Kok was wanted by the Magistrate in Kokstad on a charge that would see him imprisoned. The two rebels led an aborted siege of Kokstad in 1878 with Rietvlei being the accepted place where the rebels hatched their plot. The turmoil following the Griqua uprising forever changed the face of East Griqualand with the new white arrivals losing trust in the Griqua who had traditionally been extremely loyal to the British Queen.

 

I was first alerted by Ken Strachan, the general manager of Strachan and Co in the 1970s, to the fact that Staffords Post had had token coins at about the time the first S&Co sets appeared. At the time I was doing research into the book “Kence, the trade tokens of Strachan and Co” and counting some 20,000 Strachan coins. Like the S&Co the Stafford tokens were issued because of the shortage of change. Ken described the brass tokens as being very rough with initials stamped into them in a similar manner to the East Griqualand trade tokens of W W Phillips used at Lurwayizo and Mendu. He had not seen any for many, many years and it was doubted that any remained.

 

Then I saw this 3d coin on BoB a few weeks ago. I secured the token for a few hundred rand while my maximum bid had another “0” behind the price I paid. The token fitted Ken’s description perfectly and the seller was located in Port St Johns – geographically close to the location of the original store.

 

I have no doubt that this token is an original Staffords Post trading token. It is in a very good condition for its age (see image below). It has the initials EG.PT Co (East Griqualand . Post Trading Company) and the value 3d stamped on one side. It is quite a find as it is currently unique.

 

The Stafford Post token: http://images.bidorbuy.co.za/user_images/949/1443949_100626033928_egpta.jpg

 

Kind regards

 

Scott Balson

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Staffords Post 3d

 

Well done Scott !! Mystery solved ??

 

When I saw the piece I thought perhaps it had something to do with the English & Colonial P & T Co Ltd (E C P T Co).

 

regards

Steve

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Little Miss Muffet

East London municipality 1880

IMG_6922.jpg.b978d1d40808e08f2224e20bea74c676.jpg

IMG_6916.jpg.ada830487adce0cd0be08529882777c5.jpg

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East London Ferry Token, 1880

 

Geewhizz, the history of the EL ferry token is given on pg 2 of this thread.

 

Here is a picture of a recent postcard (dated 1903) that I acquired - showing wagons waiting on the river bank to be ferried over the Buffalo River.

 

regards

Stephen van Niekerk

58f5a71c3e580_EastLondon-Ferry1903.jpg.550cd9101cfa2e78123e5b2ab51ed016.jpg

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