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Wolfeh

Union coins 1931

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Wolfeh

As a point of interest, is there any breakdown somewhere of how many coins were minted as Zuid and how many as Suid. I have been googling to no avail so thought the experienced members here may have some idea.

 

I came across this http://colnect.com/en/coins/list/ser...1-South_Africa

which states total mintage of farthings for example of type Suid were 166,422 between 1931 and 1936. A bit of amusing arithmetic whereby the mintages of 1932-1936 is subtracted leaves 62 for 1931.

 

This doesn't seem accurate, but it's a first attempt at a guess. Perhaps if these numbers are correct, there is another type of 1936 coin of which I am unaware which would increase the total.

 

I look forward to hearing from the old hands.

Edited by Wolfeh

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jwither

Given that the current NGC population count alone for the 1931 Suid is 99, there can't possibly be only 62. There are certainly many more not graded. The coin is not scarce.

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Pierre_Henri
Given that the current NGC population count alone for the 1931 Suid is 99, there can't possibly be only 62. There are certainly many more not graded. The coin is not scarce.

The 62 refers to the Halfpenny Suid that was only struck in proof. Regarding the Farthing, the Suid-issues were also struck in non proof and I would guess that they are around 5 times "scarcer" that the Zuid issue - my guess is that around 20 000+ were struck

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Wolfeh

Thank you for the responses.

 

Assuming a constant production rate throughout the year( is this a good assumption?), by implication the dies were switched around end of October. This should then be the case for all the coins of that year?

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jwither

Depends which denomination you have in mind.

 

For the 3d, 2/- and 2/6, with mintages of 66, 381 and 790, I would be really surprised if more than one die was used. For the 6d and 1/- which have mintages of about 4800 and 6600 (my recollection), though more than one die is possible I still doubt it would have been necessary. There are enough of these coins in lower grades where someone else here might know. I have never owned any of these coins as a circulation strike.

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Wolfeh
There are enough of these coins in lower grades where someone else here might know.

 

My hope exactly. :D

 

But fair point on the lower mintage coins.

Edited by Wolfeh

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jwither

I was excluding the bronze in my prior comments.

 

For the silver, I don't know the production capacity at the time but its entirely possible that each denomination (or even all of them) were (or certainly could have been) struck in one day. I'm not familiar with the technology at the SA Mint at the time but in the United States, it wouldn't have been a problem.

 

For the bronze, I don't recall the mintages offhand. Using Pierre's estimate of 20,000 Suid farthings, I don't see why all of them couldn't have been struck off of one die either. If not one, no more than two. In the US, the 1893-S (San Francisco) silver dollar has a mintage of about 100,000. All of them were struck from the same die pair to my knowledge, as there are no varieties known. You should acquire a copy of Nomisma if you don't have it. If there are multiple die varieties of the suid farthing, it should be illustrated in there.

 

On the production schedule, I don't know how it was allocated over the calendar or fiscal year. It doesn't seem to me that ti would have been necessary to strike 193,000 farthings in approximately equal proportion over the year but someone else here might know.

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Wolfeh

Thanks for the advice. I will look up a copy.

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Cold Sea

A copy of a 1946 South African engineers journal tells us the following:

 

The average life of a pair of dies depends on the metal composition - 3 penny pieces gave the lowest average of about 28 000 pieces per pair of dies. Other silver coins about 45000 pieces per pair of dies. Of the bronze, the farthing was best at 105 000 pieces. The die steel was imported but the dies were cut locally. The oldest press at the time was one from President Kruger's mint - manufactured in 1891. Thirteen presses were in use and could produce about 2,5 million coins per week.

 

From this I don't think capacity was a problem, as the mint was also producing for other countries as a source of revenue.

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Wolfeh

Thanks Cold Sea. That is interesting info. By that logic gold dies should last the longest as gold is the most malleable of the three metals. Given those estimates all the silver for that year could have been minted with a single die, and the farthing and 1/2 p would have needed two, whilst the 1p would have needed three.

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Wolfeh

It occurred to me that the information provided by Cold Sea is actually sufficient to give good estimates.

 

1/4p 1931 Zuid : 105,000

1/4p 1931 Suid : 49,000

 

Thanks again.

 

 

 

 

 

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