Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
d_ronne

RSA stamps with flaws

Recommended Posts

d_ronne

Hi can anybody tell me if these stamps have any value as collective pieces. Note the flaws.

438110_090810093125_100_2365.jpg438110_090810093317_100_2366.jpg438110_090810093656_100_2367.jpg The university stamp has the red dot between the 8 and 0. Have complete unused sheet. Was told that P.0. had ordered withdrawal of these stamps after I purchased them, thus I never used them.438110_090810093929_100_2364.jpg British stamps. They are still joined but stamp on right has been overstamped 6d.

THanks Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kennyn

Hi Dan

The GB stamp is not an overprint but is almost certainly part of the slogan postmark.

Regards

Kenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
d_ronne

Hi Kenny thanks for reply appreciated, butbeing a novice at stamp collecting could you possible explain what you mean by "slogan postmark", and would these stamps have any value as collective pieces?

 

Can you perhaps give me any information on the other stamps.

 

Regards

 

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kennyn

Hi Dan

From about the time of the first World War the Post Office realised that it had a marketable asset in the number of letters ,postcards that it sent,It therefore allowed advertising in the form of a slogan as part of the postmark.One of the first was issued during the war with the patriotic plea "Buy War Bonds".By the 60's just about every local post office had slogan postmarks.

These are collectable,preferably still on the cover,and obviously the clearer the slogan the better.Your example is unfortunately not the full slogan and as such not worth a great deal.

On the RSA stamps,I am sure DStorm will give you the answer.

Regards

Kenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gabriel 1

Hi

 

The 5c Protea stamps seem to be a printing error, not listed as a variety and I doubt would be constant. The university stamp may be a small variety but also not listed. Worth keeping for a study on RSA flaws etc. Not worth anything I am afraid.

 

Regards

Gabriel1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Patricia_Gert

Hi All,

 

Steve, please excuse my ignorance, but why would some varieties/flaws be deemed important and is listed with a high cat value, while others, like the ones here, in your opinion not be worth anything?

 

I have quite a few stamps with varieties/flaws that I am keeping just because they are "different".

 

Regards

Gert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gabriel 1

Hi

 

I think the answer to this question is not as simple as it may seem, however certain facts must be pointed out. The varieties/flaws on the stamps above are not listed in the SACC and thus no value has been put to them. A variety we must remember is a constant to a particular printing where you will find the same fault on every sheet in the same position, eg row 1 stamp 3. Printing errors or flaws are not always constant, like a "doctor blade" but a flaw such as a "cracked plate" will remain constant until rectified.

 

When I say that these varieties are not listed, I am only refering to the SACC. Most of the Union varieties are not listed in the SACC but there is a Union Handbook available, this is very useful when doing a study on a particular issue such as the "Coronation", some of my favourite varieties are found amongst these stamps, eg "Frozen Breath". The problem here lies with the fact that the Union Handbook has not been updated and has been neglected.

 

There are Study Circles that spend hours studying and documenting certain issues such as the Protea Definitives, they find many varieties and flaws, but what does it mean as far as value is concerned, if they do not make it into the SACC, nothing.

 

I am not an expert in this field and I am sure there will be others that can add and may differ from my opinion. My collecting area is the Anglo Boer War which includes the Transvaal and Free State issues. I have found many varieties amongst these issues that are not documented. I write them up myself and am not really concerned about the value, I collect for the enjoyment value and want to preserve parts of our history.

 

You should not discard your unlisted varieties, they may not have any value now (listed value) but who knows this could change.

 

Regards

Gabriel1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dstorm

Hello all

 

I think that the main criteria are whether the (minor) flaws are constant or not.

 

A constant flaw normally depicts a flaw in the plate or cylinder. Therefore it is worth recording. And therefore of consequence.

 

This is also the paradox (call it weirdness) of philately. A Missing colour is normally worth big more. yet it is seldom constant!

 

Minor “Spots and Dots” also known as “Flyspecks” will always make a collection more interesting, yet they are of very little financial value.

 

Regards

 

Jacques

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
blacktail12

If one has copies of the SA Philatelist from the 70's and 80's you will find inserts where a plating study was undertaken and all these odd spots specks were noted. The Sa Stamp Study Circle still has a good look at modern material

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RISadler

Keep the stamps. They're not "not worth anything." The fact that the "standard" catalogue doesn't list them means nothing. They may be in the next catalogue or the one after that or after that... well, you get the idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×