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Cold Sea

Kruger Brockage

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Cold Sea

Thought I'd share this interesting stumble:

 

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]3921[/ATTACH]

 

A true one-off. A brockage occurs when the striking process goes awry. When a coin is struck one die is static and fixed in position, usually the obverse, as is the case here c.1898-1900. The glitch in the process occurs with the feeding in of the coin blanks. A blank flan previous to the brockage we have here would have entered the striking chamber and, not seated quite on target, it would be unable to exit easily after striking. The blank adhered to the moving reverse die. The next blank gold flan to be struck, our soon-to-be-brockage coin, will have entered the chamber and the reverse die with the previous coin stuck to it will have struck this new flan with an incuse obverse impression on its reverse, it receiving the obverse impression from the lower die as usual. At this point the problem in the process is usually discovered. Brockages are often spectacular and occur in gold coinage with much less frequency than the silver and copper, due to the higher quality control in working with gold.

 

Valued around R100 000, it is part of the famous Bentley collection.

Edited by Cold Sea

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Cold Sea

Baldwin's auctioned this coin last month for GBP13 000, or roughly R180 000. I include a link to a superb collection of South African gold coins which formed part of this very special auction.

 

Sixbid: Baldwin's Auction 76

Edited by Cold Sea

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EishGK

This is a superb specimen. I love error coins and have a few brockage specimens but none as classic/perfect as this.

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