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gabriel 1

Philatelic Terms

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Hi

 

I have noticed in some circles and publications that terms for unwanted material tend to vary. Rust has suddenly become "toning" and I have seen "foxing", although this may have been the original term. Rust sounds closer to the truth, toning is a softer approach in an attempt to send out the message that it does not detract.

 

Gabriel1

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Hi Gabriel 1

 

I agree with you. Ultimately whichever term is used, this is oxidation of the mineral content in the paper when the last ingredient is added namely moisture.

 

Whatever way you look at it and whether one prefers the term foxing, toning or rust it is the same thing. Even when doctored with chemicals to try and hide the discoloration this only hides the problem and in most cases where rust is more serious the damage is done.

 

If the seller then at least acknowledges this in his/her description, we are going in the right direction. Query rust with some sellers from the coast and they look at you in utter amazement as to how you could expect no rust. We here on the highveld are lucky to have less humidity.

 

Stamps with rust are as bad as stamps with pen marks, staple holes and thins and should be treated as such.

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I disagree with the assessment on the word toning. Take for example, if a white piece of paper is exposed to the sun it tones it a hue of brown and this is then referred to as toning (NOT TANNING), Certain old envelopes tend to begin toning around the edges and this is deffinitely not rust. Just a little food for thought.

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Hi Angela

 

I am happy with the fact that paper does discolour naturally and with exposure to the sun, the fact is that rust is being reffered to as toning by some sellers. I am not specifically talking about BoB, I buy from all over the world and have noticed it time and again.

 

Regards

Gabriel1

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I agree totally, I do not want to give the wrong impression that if/when my listing states toning, buyers will now think the word toning means rust.

 

I recently sold several covers, and all along the top part of the envelopes there was toning, and on some covers it formed a complete frame around the edge of the envelope, and this was due to obvious light exposure and it was correctly listed as toning.

 

If a seller does not know the difference between toning, rust or foxing (I dont know what foxing is suppose to describe so I will never use this terminology, perhaps you can enlighten me) the word/s should not be used.

 

Blessings and regards

Angela

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Education, the more buyers/sellers that visit the forum the better.

 

Gabriel1

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Hi Angela

Foxing looks very similar to rust on stamps or old envelopes appearing as tan or brown spots.

There are two main theories put forward for the cause,firstly as Seahorse stated that it is caused by rust and a second that it is a type of mildew damage caused by insect or bacteria waste.

Humidity is a major factor in the cause and advancement of foxing.

It is not easy to remove as the bleach solution used affects the ink of the stamp and getting the right ammount for each item is a matter of trial and error.

Kind Regards

Kenny

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Hello Ken

 

Thank you so much for the info, just goes to show one in never too old to learn something new everyday and I have learnt 2 new bits of infor within the last 5 days.

 

I have bought several Garage Collection (and I mean they were stored in garages) which had brown spots on them and with destinct Rat excrement evidence and I thought these spots were the evidence of rat's urine disposal on to the covers. The spots look almost like rust but the shape and size of the brown mark disputes this. Obviuosly the cause is irrelevant because a damaged item remains damaged no matter what word one uses.

 

Again thanks for another lesson well taught.

 

Blessings

Angela

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Try this,

 

Give stamps a good wash (not fugative inks) in HOT water with a touch of dishwash (this give the stamps a good clean and in many cases WILL remove some of the foxing (badgering, weaseling etc) then rinse in at least two seperate baths of clean water. Dry as usual - i use drying books.

 

I also have (for those that are interested) a full list of chemicals used by paper archivists for various treatments.

 

also - for those that have the money have a look at a preservation pencil used in all good libraries, museums etc. this is very expensive but has a stunning method of cleaning.

 

 

http://www.preservationequipment.com/Store/Products/Equipment-$4-Tools/Machines/Preservation-Pencil%C2%AE

 

Rgds

 

Colin

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Hi Colin

 

I know that you have been experimenting with paper for a while now. As I collect items from the Boer War alot of them have rust for obvious reasons. How should these be stored?, I do not want to clean them as they are fragile as it is and I do not want to change the character that they have. Should I store such items seperately from other items?, how contagious is rust?

 

Regards

Gabriel1

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rust is highly contagious. NEVER store foxed stamps with normal as the rust can spread.

 

Store your covers in seperate pockets as far as possible.

 

For covers, it is advised that a rub with dry bread crust side will remove a lot of dirt but not paper. This is a common method used by museums. Rubbers/erasers are a no no as they tend to remove paper. Why dont you try this on a modern dirty cover first and see if you like the result.

 

Obviously the ageing adds to the enjoyment and the question to clean or not is a personal choice.

 

Also, if you have creases you can iron these out using a warm not hot iron (no steam). Sandwich the cover between brown paper. Again this is a personal choice. I have had good results with stamps.

 

Another little tip that does work. For those goodies that some idiot mounted with sellotape. Iron stamp in between brown paper using a warm iron. Keep moving the paper and you will see that a lot of the glue is actually pulled out into the brown paper. There are some specialised chemicals that can also be used. The main problem is time so obviously only the real goodies are worth the effort - hey they are damaged in any case so there is nothing to lose.

 

Point to ponder - there is a well known dealer from the Cape that has a name for cleaning up stamps. I am not sure that it is ok to mention name in open forum.

 

Rgds

 

Colin

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