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4kids

Scottish Terriers

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Anyone interested in Scottish Terriers, Please support the Animal Talk this December and at the same time see some of our dogs in pictures.

 

Regards

Jan

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Anyone interested in Scottish Terriers, Please support the Animal Talk this December and at the same time see some of our dogs in pictures.

 

Regards

Jan

 

They are stunning dogs, i will have a look for sure! You must post some pictures for me to see!

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Here is my orriginal article before the magazine had done some edits.

 

The true origin of the Scottish Terrier has been lost in time and will forever remain a mystery. It is one of the oldest and most purest of dog breeds around and throughout the ages the breed maintained its distinctive type and character. What is known about the history of the breed it that it originated and is the most ancient breed emanating from the Scottish Highlands.

 

The breeds first introduction to dog fanciers was in 1860 during a Dog Show in Birmingham, England and the first Scottish Terrier club there was formed in 1882. The fist of this breed to be exported was to to the U.S.A. in 1883 after which the first Scottish Terrier in the U.S.A. was whelped in September 1884. The Scottish Terrier Club of America was formed in 1900.

 

Little known fact is that in the early days all Scottish Terriers were found in a variety of colors including, grey, wheaten, and various brindle colors but not black. Today the perception is that a Scottie should be black which is mainly due to the advertising media that incorrectly perceives all Scotties to be Black. The truth is that all colors are accepted and some fanciers prefers wheaten or brindle Scotties. Sprinklings of silver and white in a black Scottie is most common with even a dash of white often seen on the chest or chin.

 

Small compact, short-legged, sturdily-built is a trademark of this breed. This is a dog of substance with a head long in proportion to it’s size. The eyes are almond shaped, bright and dark brown in color. The body is moderately short with a deep. broad chest and very muscular hindquarters. The back is firm and level. Ears and tail are carried erect which gives the breed this unique alert appearance. A sturdy Dog that is no pushover and will not be intimidated. The coat is an genetic inherited trait that enabled this wonderful breed to survive the most harsh conditions of the Scottish Highlands. The average ideal height of a Scottie is 25cm to 28cm tall at the withers and the males should weight around 8.6 - 10kg and females 8.2 - 9.5kg. The breeding of smaller Scotties is frowned upon and discouraged by all responsible breeders.

 

Making a Scottie part of your family is a long term commitment. Scotties are hardy dogs with an average life span of more than 12 years providing that they get tender love and care, proper nutrition, exercise an veterinary care when needed. These dogs are proud, independent, tenacious, brave, bold, bossy intelligent, fearless, devoted and sometimes obstinate and have a true sense of humor. They are extremely bright en energetic and have no limits to the things that they can learn and do and when they are having fun, their enthusiasm is contagious. They make wonderful companions, excellent guardians and hard workers and throughout the ages have been revered for their loyalty,bravery and spirit. These mentioned traits makes it obvious that Scotties are active dogs and at least moderate excersise is nessesary such as play and walking.

 

Scottish Terriers are double coated with a outer coat that is wirery and somewhat harder that the inner coat. This is protection against water. The inner coat which is much softer and denser for protection against excessive cold. Regular brushing of the coat is needed to remove undercoat and dead hairs in the outer coat. Scotties sheds minimal or almost no hair and makes them a perfect indoor companion in households where shed hair is an issue. If your Scottie is to become a loved pet and you do not plan to show it professionally a visit to a doggie parlor twice a year apart from a regular brushing should be sufficient and you can have a "Scottie Cut" done on your dog. However if you plan to ever show your dog it is advised that you never have your Scottie "Parlor Groomed" Grooming must begin at an early age and stepped up during the changeover to adult coat. Scottish Terriers need to be professionally stripped three to four times a year, the chest, legs and head being clipped. Between these sessions, the hair should be regularly brushed and combed, especially around the mouth where particles of food can gather on the beard and moustache areas. Breeders should be able to assist with advise and information on professional grooming.

 

A well bred Scottie is bred for good temperament and good health. Choose a breeder that is willing "and proud" for you to inspect the environment and the parents in which the dogs are kept. Happy parents makes for healthy and happy Scottie puppies. Most responsible breeders are members of established Terrier Clubs and often show their dogs. Ask your breeder to tell you something about their dogs, their background and accolades. A breeder who tests his breeding stock in the show ring is able to offer quality pets that are close to the Scottish Terrier Standard in conformation and temperament. Beware of puppy farms as this a a popular breed amongst unscrupulous breeders.

 

Responsible breeders will also refrain from breeding with dogs which shows or tests positive for hereditary diseases such a vonWillebrand's Disease, a devastating bleeding disorder, Craniomandibular Osteopathy (CMO) which a painful, non-cancerous, inherited disease that involves excess bony growth in immature dogs and Cerebellar Abiotrophy (CA) and Scottie Cramp which are two Neurological Disorders affecting the breed.

Edited by 4kids
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Here is my orriginal article before the magazine had done some edits.

 

The true origin of the Scottish Terrier has been lost in time and will forever remain a mystery. It is one of the oldest and most purest of dog breeds around and throughout the ages the breed maintained its distinctive type and character. What is known about the history of the breed it that it originated and is the most ancient breed emanating from the Scottish Highlands.

 

The breeds first introduction to dog fanciers was in 1860 during a Dog Show in Birmingham, England and the first Scottish Terrier club there was formed in 1882. The fist of this breed to be exported was to to the U.S.A. in 1883 after which the first Scottish Terrier in the U.S.A. was whelped in September 1884. The Scottish Terrier Club of America was formed in 1900.

 

Little known fact is that in the early days all Scottish Terriers were found in a variety of colors including, grey, wheaten, and various brindle colors but not black. Today the perception is that a Scottie should be black which is mainly due to the advertising media that incorrectly perceives all Scotties to be Black. The truth is that all colors are accepted and some fanciers prefers wheaten or brindle Scotties. Sprinklings of silver and white in a black Scottie is most common with even a dash of white often seen on the chest or chin.

 

Small compact, short-legged, sturdily-built is a trademark of this breed. This is a dog of substance with a head long in proportion to it’s size. The eyes are almond shaped, bright and dark brown in color. The body is moderately short with a deep. broad chest and very muscular hindquarters. The back is firm and level. Ears and tail are carried erect which gives the breed this unique alert appearance. A sturdy Dog that is no pushover and will not be intimidated. The coat is an genetic inherited trait that enabled this wonderful breed to survive the most harsh conditions of the Scottish Highlands. The average ideal height of a Scottie is 25cm to 28cm tall at the withers and the males should weight around 8.6 - 10kg and females 8.2 - 9.5kg. The breeding of smaller Scotties is frowned upon and discouraged by all responsible breeders.

 

Making a Scottie part of your family is a long term commitment. Scotties are hardy dogs with an average life span of more than 12 years providing that they get tender love and care, proper nutrition, exercise an veterinary care when needed. These dogs are proud, independent, tenacious, brave, bold, bossy intelligent, fearless, devoted and sometimes obstinate and have a true sense of humor. They are extremely bright en energetic and have no limits to the things that they can learn and do and when they are having fun, their enthusiasm is contagious. They make wonderful companions, excellent guardians and hard workers and throughout the ages have been revered for their loyalty,bravery and spirit. These mentioned traits makes it obvious that Scotties are active dogs and at least moderate excersise is nessesary such as play and walking.

 

Scottish Terriers are double coated with a outer coat that is wirery and somewhat harder that the inner coat. This is protection against water. The inner coat which is much softer and denser for protection against excessive cold. Regular brushing of the coat is needed to remove undercoat and dead hairs in the outer coat. Scotties sheds minimal or almost no hair and makes them a perfect indoor companion in households where shed hair is an issue. If your Scottie is to become a loved pet and you do not plan to show it professionally a visit to a doggie parlor twice a year apart from a regular brushing should be sufficient and you can have a "Scottie Cut" done on your dog. However if you plan to ever show your dog it is advised that you never have your Scottie "Parlor Groomed" Grooming must begin at an early age and stepped up during the changeover to adult coat. Scottish Terriers need to be professionally stripped three to four times a year, the chest, legs and head being clipped. Between these sessions, the hair should be regularly brushed and combed, especially around the mouth where particles of food can gather on the beard and moustache areas. Breeders should be able to assist with advise and information on professional grooming.

 

A well bred Scottie is bred for good temperament and good health. Choose a breeder that is willing "and proud" for you to inspect the environment and the parents in which the dogs are kept. Happy parents makes for healthy and happy Scottie puppies. Most responsible breeders are members of established Terrier Clubs and often show their dogs. Ask your breeder to tell you something about their dogs, their background and accolades. A breeder who tests his breeding stock in the show ring is able to offer quality pets that are close to the Scottish Terrier Standard in conformation and temperament. Beware of puppy farms as this a a popular breed amongst unscrupulous breeders.

 

Responsible breeders will also refrain from breeding with dogs which shows or tests positive for hereditary diseases such a vonWillebrand's Disease, a devastating bleeding disorder, Craniomandibular Osteopathy (CMO) which a painful, non-cancerous, inherited disease that involves excess bony growth in immature dogs and Cerebellar Abiotrophy (CA) and Scottie Cramp which are two Neurological Disorders affecting the breed.

 

Thanks for the call, welcome and i can see you are going to benefit my group, please post some interesting facts of your breed there for all to enjoy, so little is known about the breed and i for one can just learn from your personal experience, have a great evening!

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