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collectors investments

Question about silver composition of coin

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collectors investments

Hi,

Just a question with regards to the 50c (2oz) silver The Elephant coin (see attached certificate)

 

The weight of the coin is 76.252g

Metal content is 925 silver.

 

That means it contains 70.53g of fine silver.

 

The coin is marketed as a 2 ounce silver coin.

2 ounces = 62,2g

 

That means the coin has an extra amount of more than 8g of silver above the two ounces.

 

Why would the mint manufacture the coins with an extra 8g of fine silver?

 

50c.jpg

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Cold Sea

You might just have a point

Edited by Cold Sea

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MrBosch

Unless your coin actually weighs 76.252g, it is just a typing error and should obviously read 67.252g. However, the same error occurs in Hern's handbook where the specs are given for these coins.

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alloway65

Interesting....I have just weighed one of my 50c Elephant Coins and it weighs 76.6 grams!

My feeling is that when the dies were designed and manufactured there was a miscalculation of the thickness of the coins to achieve the required mass of 2 ounces of "actual" silver. This might have been discovered by the SA Mint but it was cheaper for them to leave the dies as is and to let the purchasers benefit from the extra silver content.

The SA Mint charges such a large premium for their gold and silver Coins, they, in real terms would not loose (much)!!!

David

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alloway65

I have just weighted all my other 50 Cent Wildlife Series coins and they all weigh more or less the same and all the certificates I have state 76.252 grams.

There must be a logical explanation!!!

David

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collectors investments

Hi David,

 

I just weighed our one and it weighs 76,2g.

 

4000 of these coins were minted.

So, an extra 33,32 kilograms of fine silver was used in the manufacture of this series than should have been.

I guess the mint would have worked in the extra cost into the selling price.

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alloway65

Solved, the SA Mint have used an Avoirdupois Ounce which has a mass of approx 10% more than a Troy Ounce!

 

Troy Ounce 31.1 grams.

Avoirdupois Ounce 34.12 grams.

 

(2 x 34.12) / 0.925 = 73.77 grams...near enough with rounding up the decimal points!

 

David

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collectors investments

Isn`t an avoirdupois ounce equal to 28,3g which is less than a troy ounce?

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alloway65

Sorry you are right, silly me......I will put it down to old age....my engineering brain has also gone into retirement!!!!!!!!:embarrest::embarrest::embarrest:

 

Back to square one!!!:blink1:

 

quote

The troy ounce (ozt) is a unit of imperial measure. In the present day it is most commonly used to gauge the weight of precious metals.

One troy ounce nowadays defined as exactly 0.0311034768 kg = 31.1034768 g.

There are ca. 32.1507466 troy oz in 1 kg.

One troy ounce is equivalent to ca. 1.09714 avoirdupois ounces.

unquote

 

David

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Dulal
The SA Mint charges such a large premium for their gold and silver Coins, they, in real terms would not loose (much)!!!

David

 

Silver price of less than 10 dolllars/ ounce in the past would not cost them a lot for that extra. Price at present/ future may force them to think to take out that extra or add more premium with present premium.

 

Dulal

Edited by Dulal

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alloway65

Maybe the SA Mint can give us a definitive answer...now they are selling on BoB!!!:smile:

David

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