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geejay50

Scarce Coin Watch

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geejay50

Hello Collectors,

 

One of the lots not mentioned after April's Heritage Auction Sale was the graded 1931 Proof Set that sold with Buyers Premium for $48,875 or R342 125 (4 bidders)

 

I can remember winning a raw 1931 Proof set in 2008 for 10,000 GBP in the UK for another collector. After all costs of grading and buyers premium were taken into account , the set cost R150,000 approximately. I enclose pics of the key coins in my view.The coins were stunning in the hand and what appears to be brownish toning was actually a rainbow effect under loupe. The sharp lettering is well shown.

 

Quality definitely ignores economic downturns and if you have the best of something with a strong story line, you always have the assurance that there will be a buyer who will pay a decent price.

 

Geejay

58f5a722cf036_1931Halfcrownpramp1.jpg.d319cadbc80f29145143102e15a0bd01.jpg

58f5a722d37e8_1931TwoShillingamp.jpg.be0d4ae928fd1fa67e46047c038b8692.jpg

58f5a722d7e41_1931ShillingProamp.jpg.d7c77690fe5c1617c4253d55fa882bf0.jpg

58f5a722dc137_1931ThreepenceRamp1.jpg.3eeafa9b76de51855e87febf980ab06a.jpg

58f5a722e0552_1931HalfpennyPramp1.jpg.c98859e0010be4e5a418d0c7353627b9.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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geejay50

Here are the last members of that raw 1931 set from 2008.

There were no grades under 62 to my knowledge.

Geejay

58f5a722e50a8_1931SixpenceProamp1.jpg.3cfb3c6240ebec2a49a494cde484490a.jpg

58f5a722e9691_1931PennyProofamp8.jpg.069d960cccbe0c1fa9bd12edf198c19f.jpg

58f5a722edb16_1931FarthingPfamp82.jpg.e8edf984f1bd24fb9126716c7b0f2871.jpg

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geejay50

Hi Ernesto,

Thanks for your opinion as regards different colour Pennies. I accept that the colour difference and the actual coin scarcity overall affect what buyers are prepared to pay.

All will accept say that 1933 is a tough year for most denominations especially the Halfcrown, Two Shilling and the Coppers.

Therefore a Halfpenny in that year is especially scarce and sought after but not too tough in BN.

In the case of the colour Red, one has had a unique coin in Halfpenny MS65RD that has a mate at PCGS in MS64RD

I have had the luck to own both those coins and sold the MS64 for a sum equal to the best ZAR Coppers.The MS65RD remains with me.

 

Thanks

 

Geejay

58f5a722f2a3b_1933HalfpennyMSamp54.jpg.f31f9607ba0e6c4a196c5bba79848964.jpg

58f5a72303607_1933HalfpennyMSamp54.jpg.f5a35a6073ca9fb548b9bb736fae2990.jpg

58f5a72308302_1933HalfpennyMSamp54.jpg.c78feaf431794fc875db949d7e5a6800.jpg

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geejay50

Hello Collectors,

 

The 1965 CENT is a collectible coin mainly because it marks a change in size from the first decimal series to the second.

 

There are 12 different varieties so far graded by NGC with some like the Double Thick Planchet having a mintage that is less than 185 (unknown) to the Business strike issue in English of 26 158. There have been two brown coins and 3 red brown coins graded in the double thick variety.

 

I have not seen a set of all 12 yet, but am really trying to get there one day. the Proof in Afrikaans still eludes me. The only one that I put an offer in on went for a higher price.

 

Any input of rare coins especially with photos will be highly appreciated by all collectors.This is a coin, token and medallion website and is there for that purpose.

 

Geejay

58f5a7230c94e_19651CentThick.jpg.3aa1df1e9b45472fc4834a7400fdf758.jpg

58f5a72310cc7_19651CentThick.jpg.52f1e5665b880bf6504a20d83305b4a5.jpg

58f5a7231500d_19651CentThick.jpg.24a730216644084101244178e64a6f86.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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Algreco

Ancient Coinage - The Phokaia

 

I know this post is slightly off topic, but I think this may be of interest to some some avid readers of this wonderful forum.

 

Listed below are picturesof a Phokaia which dates back to 477-388 BC, and weighs in at 2.53 gm. Interestingly enough the coin is made out of electrum - a naturally occurring alloy of silver and gold.

 

58f5a72336311_ElHekte-B..jpg.f83952c0bbc21e0d44d2c8f20d3f0a89.jpg

The Phokaia is considered to be one of the oldest and smallest coins in the world.

 

This little darling happens to be in my collection - Head of nymph left, hair at back of head bound with net; behind, seal (off flan) / Quadripartite incuse square.

 

Cheers

Nick (Algreco)

58f5a723197d6_ElHekte-F..jpg.3af405ce06385e105a220c4aa623619e.jpg

Edited by Algreco

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geejay50

Hello Nick,

 

Thanks a ton for your posting.

 

Dr Frank Mitchell, well known as a founder of South African Numismatics as we know it to-day, was first inspired towards this hobby when he held an Ancient Greek Coin from Alexander the Great in his hand. He realised then with a shock that here he held evidence of real history from more than 2000 years ago that reflected on a ruler who had conquered the entire known world at the time (336-323 BC).

 

Ancient coins are where it all began and they started in Lydia a small but wealthy state in Asia Minor in the period somewhere around 620 - 600 BC. The reason why Lydia was wealthy was precisely because it had reserves of elektrum (mixture of Gold and Silver as you mentioned) in the sands of the Pactolus River. Someone had the idea of making lumps of electrum of the same size and purity and stamping them with a seal to show that there was governmental sanction for them to be as used as trade media. The idea was almost immediately adopted by adjacent Greek Colonies in Ionia (to-day Western Turkey). Early coins were crude but later coins had depictions of animals and Gods. That is where your Phokaia came in - named after that town now Foka in Turkey.

 

Elektrum became problematic as a medium for coinage as it had varying amounts of Gold and Silver. It was the last king of Lydia , Croesus (561-546BC) who abandoned it in favour of the bimetalic system - gold and silver staters- (twenty silver pieces equaled one gold). Although Lydia fell to the Persian Empire in 546BC, the bimetalic concept of coinage had already spread to the rest of the Ancient World and was kept ever since.

 

I have also two Ancient coins in my collection (see pics), one Alexander the Great Tetradrachm with an eccentric strike - I had it graded by NGC who slabbed it in a specially extra thick slab to accomodate the thickness of the coin. The grading is different and not Sheldon based - broadly VF, Strike 3/5 Surface 4/5.

Greek coins did not have the ruler on them because they considered no man to be better than any other and was not worthy of having his effigy on a coin (Are our politicians taking note?? - I was passed by the blue light gang to-day!!) In the case of the Alexander Coin, Heracles with a lion mane around his head on the obverse and Zeus on the reverse.

 

In the case of the Didrachm from Calabria, (AU Strike 4/5 Surface 5/5) they believed that the prosperous town Tarentum in Southern Italy was founded by Taras the son of Poseidon, the seagod. They believed that Taras was shipwrecked near the city he founded and his father sent a Dolphin to rescue him so the Tarentine stater depicts him riding on a Dolphin.The horse and rider crowning the horse reflects on the area's pride in their fleet footed horses who often won racing competitions of the day. (reference: Money of the World - Richard G Doty)

 

I hope this has helped give you some more appreciation of your coin

 

Geejay

58f5a7233c04b_336-350BCAlexaamp1.jpg.aabf74bbfe2f42904a6c9487306b9354.jpg

58f5a72340dc3_336-350BCAlexaamp1.jpg.ed48cf7d79a1495440647af5ccb37faf.jpg

58f5a72345881_300BCCalabriaTaamp1.jpg.c377876a83fb97c4c2386f9dc83bdaec.jpg

58f5a7234a167_300BCCalabriaTaamp1.jpg.0d4646d47a570fa500cff46774050c4c.jpg

58f5a7234f1ff_300BCCalabriaTaamp1.jpg.2d290aea918374a54acfd379e588b7ea.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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Algreco
I hope this has helped give you some more appreciation of your coin

 

Absolutely! I personally prefer not having any ancients slabbed - You enjoy the coin more. There is nothing more satisfying than having a coin of this stature sitting in the palm of your hand, and thinking of all the hundreds if not thousands of hands it has passed through. I also think, this is where numismatics becomes awe inspiring, and in many ways I can relate to the way in which Dr Frank Mitchell felt.

 

Anyway, great thread Georg!

 

Cheers

Nick

Edited by Algreco

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jwither
Hello Collectors,

 

One of the lots not mentioned after April's Heritage Auction Sale was the graded 1931 Proof Set that sold with Buyers Premium for $48,875 or R342 125 (4 bidders)

 

I can remember winning a raw 1931 Proof set in 2008 for 10,000 GBP in the UK for another collector. After all costs of grading and buyers premium were taken into account , the set cost R150,000 approximately. I enclose pics of the key coins in my view.The coins were stunning in the hand and what appears to be brownish toning was actually a rainbow effect under loupe. The sharp lettering is well shown.

 

Quality definitely ignores economic downturns and if you have the best of something with a strong story line, you always have the assurance that there will be a buyer who will pay a decent price.

 

Geejay

 

I believe the NGC census includes all of the 1931 silver in proof cameo. I could see a set with those coins selling for this price, but not otherwise. By way of comparison, Heritage sold a PCGS graded 1933 set for $25,200 a few years ago. I do not know what this set would sell for now, maybe it would be a lot more. But in any event, the 1933 should sell for a lot more than the 1931.

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jwither
Hi Ernesto,

Thanks for your opinion as regards different colour Pennies. I accept that the colour difference and the actual coin scarcity overall affect what buyers are prepared to pay.

All will accept say that 1933 is a tough year for most denominations especially the Halfcrown, Two Shilling and the Coppers.

Therefore a Halfpenny in that year is especially scarce and sought after but not too tough in BN.

In the case of the colour Red, one has had a unique coin in Halfpenny MS65RD that has a mate at PCGS in MS64RD

I have had the luck to own both those coins and sold the MS64 for a sum equal to the best ZAR Coppers.The MS65RD remains with me.

 

Thanks

 

Geejay

 

I can see the 1933 KGV bronze in RD selling for the same as among the best 1892 ZAR 1D, but that is because those coins in MS are actually scarce, regardless of color. The 1923 bronze is not scarce at all. It is common.

 

I forgot to mention that I also own one of the "red variety" 1923 farthings. It does not look like the 1D you bought but it definitely looks different from any other MS farthing I have owned or seen. However, NGC did not grade it "red" or even RB. They graded it brown (incorrectly in my opinion) and as an MS-62, it is worth far less than the $350 I paid for it.

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Algreco

Up and coming QEII

 

Surprisingly enough a 1954 QEII 2/6 graded MS66 by the NGC sold for over $740.00 at HA.

 

Here is the little beasty:

58f5a723580c5_1954HCOBV..jpg.60ac43fbc56bcc9c609ed02784ebfae2.jpg

 

The coin is an absolute stunner and is worthy of its grade. Make no mistake, you not going to find a lot of these "beasties" popping up anytime soon. This series (QEII 1953 - 1960) is usually associated with a poor relief and strike. The silver coins in particular were heavily circulated which in turn, reduces the chances of you finding BU type specimens without sweating some blood.

 

A series which in my opinion is heavily underestimated!!!!!!!!

58f5a72353658_1954HCREV..jpg.54abec0583f91573bfc43cffd5c6b276.jpg

Edited by Algreco

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geejay50

Hi Nick and Ernesto,

 

Thanks for your postings. The Queen Elizabeth period is marked by high mintages in the millions but with high wear as you so indicated Nick. This was a period of the "baby boomers" and the surging post war economy made heavy use of silver money.

 

That MS66 1954 Halfcrown was a unique coin at pop 1 unshared and I fully aggree with you Nick that it deserved the price it got. Of the 4 252 061 coins minted , there are only 24 graded at NGC and nil at PCGS. Of the coins graded at NGC VF(1),AU50(2),55(3),58(2),MS63(2),63(5),64(6),65(1),66(1). That is not a lot of decent surviving coins given the mintage.

 

I accept some increase in the Grading figure in time to come as this issue is still relatively modern but looking around, I dont see a lot of decent 1954 Silvers on offer in raw form certainly a top grade like 66 will be very hard to match given that NGC does not easily give such high grades to the weak strikes of this era.

 

The market may look back in five years time and admit that there was a real bargain going begging. Those with some foresight now, may be rubbing their hands with glee soon.

 

Thanks again for all your postings.

 

Geejay.

Edited by geejay50

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geejay50

ZAR Patterns are they worth collecting

 

Hello Collectors,

 

Many of you who collect the well known ZAR Lauer type Patterns may feel a bit disappointed at how they dont seem to have performed quite as well as the other eras of our coinage.

 

One collector mentioned how scarce they used to be in the past only to have become quite common lately. Another collector thought that the Chinese had forged a lot.

 

I am almost sure that forgery by the Chinese is not the reason because whenever they try to forge any of our coins, they do make telling mistakes and their copies are never Mint State let alone Proof Strikes.We give the Chinese Forgers more credit than they deserve. The shear beauty and precision of these Pattern coins is so breathtaking that only a really top class coin maker like Wolfgang Lauer could have made such things of beauty.

 

I have a Pattern in my collection where I lost my head in an auction in 2009. It is an undated Griquatown 1890 SP65 BN coin and it had been photographed extremely well by the seller who has the apt tradename of "Greattoning". He captured the blue on the Reverse at that critical angle so as to have a uniform sheet of blue. I have never been able to reproduce this shot. The end price was $5177 (R39,563). The underbidder was not even a buyer of African Coins - he obviously had a similar passion for pretty coins. (see pics)

 

There remains a hard core of collectors of high grade Patterns and I suspect their zeal arises mostly from their obsession with beauty, just like a collector of unique paintings.

 

Please let us know your thoughts, you are welcome to share your rare gems.

 

Geejay

58f5a7235d0c4_1890Pf65GQTPattamp1.jpg.13f2498099740630c006f5106d72d151.jpg

58f5a72361730_1890Pf65GQTPattamp1.jpg.a8a1b5c94728cc6feeebcf95b3a9032c.jpg

58f5a72366545_1890Pf65GQTPattamp1.jpg.bd2216fbfefce58f841b002e2d449d55.jpg

58f5a7236b404_1890Pf65GQTPattamp1.jpg.8d73adb77ba63d981fa5cf091f7a11d9.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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Rare NotesCoins

I also love the pennies red or brown from the 1930's. Now here is a scarse coin!

 

I would just like you guys to know that I have also just got a Stunner of a coin graded at Ngc. I send 9 1939 Unc pennies for grading and just got my grades.

All 9 graded MS

But "my precious" is:

0061939S.AFRICA PENNYMS 65 BN :surprised:

 

My day and week has been made. I will post photo's as soon as I have them in my hand

 

Keep up the good informative sticky

 

Regards Morne

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geejay50

Well done Morne !!

1949 Pennies have far fewer graded in business strike (25 - all colours) than in Proof (45 - all colours) and of the Brown coins, so far only 8 have been graded all in MS with pop 1 sitting at MS65 unshared. Has NGC already entered your 9 coins ? If so , then there must be other colours in the batch.

I notice that only three Brown Proof coins have been graded making this colour the scarcest in Proof (37 RB and 5 RD in PF)

For a coin with a mintage of 3 633 691 , 25 business strikes graded at NGC is not a lot at all. The 45 Proof coins from a Proof mintage of 800 shows us just how much more the collectors have looked after Proofs.i also think there was mass wear of these Pennies during the time of economic surge with the "baby boomers" leaving really very few in really top grades for us collectors.

We look forward to the pic of your stunning MS65BN coin. Thanks for sharing this with us.

Geejay

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geejay50
Lovely coin. I currently have one at pcgs and hope to have the grade in 2 to 3 weeks.

 

Dear Southernaurora,

I see another 1894 2 Rupie has been graded by PCGS - an AU58

Very Nice - I hope its yours?

Geejay

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Pierre_Henri

Some points to ponder ...

 

If one ignores the NGC and PCGS grading stats for the sake of the following argument, and focuses on “not graded coins still out there”, a total different picture of the scarcity of Union of SA coins emerges.

 

Let me give you an example: I don’t care how many 1923 Pennies in MS have been discovered in the recent past : - that coin is SCARCE in ungraded form in Mint State.

Also scarce, in my opinion (we are talking NON-graded coins) – are the 1923 and 1926 Half Pennies, the 1931, 1932 and 1933 and the 1944 Pennies, the 1928 Tickey and the 1923, 1926 and 1936 Six Pences, etc. in EF or better condition.

 

I am not laying when I say that I go through thousands of “non searched / picked ” Union silver coins each month, and, just for example, a decent 1928 Tickey just never turn up – they are as scarce in EF as the proverbial hens teeth...

 

I did not check the latest NGC stats for this coin (1928 Tickey), but if a substantial number exists in top graded condition(s), they must surely fall in the same category as the 1930 Shilling, where “most” of the graded specimens – according to a fairly recent post on BoB - are in the same collection (same owner) and the availability is therefore near to zero and much rarer than the “statistics” say they are..

 

The 1944, 1945 and 1946 shillings are another example, with the 1944 date especially – like the rare 1926 issue – almost always turning up in only so-so condition (G and VG)

 

My point is, that if one bases your assumption on the scarcity of a certain coin on the NGC and PCGS grading stats solely, one might make a BIG mistake.

 

Happy collecting

 

Pierre

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geejay50

Thanks Pierre,

 

Point well made and you mentioned some really tough coins that just will not turn up easily in anything above XF in the thousands of ungraded Union coins one sifts through on and off the internet.

 

People think that because there is a hoard of top grade 1923 Pennies that have been put up for sale recently , the coin is now too common to put away as an investment. Remember how common a mint state 1897 halfcrown was about three years ago? Now try and find one and remember too how one could pick them up for as little as R700 then - now R4500 is not too much?

 

I have been lucky enough to bump into a really tough sixpence and three pence Pierre mentioned.The first , I bought graded in Jan 2009 and the other I found raw on bob in 2008.

 

1923 6d NGC: 21 graded 9 in MS, pop 1 MS66 unshared, pop2 MS65 unshared : PCGS 7 coins graded 4 in MS Pop1 MS65 unshared -this coin

1928 3d NGC: 20 graded 14 in MS pop 1 MS65 unshared, pop2 MS63 (5), pop3 MS62(4)- this coin

 

I would like to share these coins with fellow collectors.

 

Geejay

58f5a7239ee21_1923SixpenceMS65.jpg.c87167fb10ea680315d11fabb359c011.jpg

58f5a723a888e_1923SixpenceMS65.jpg.6d7e4f7e68148603858ec61082a7411c.jpg

58f5a723adb1e_1923SixpenceMS65.jpg.e939d6597d97a91ad03966b70774cbd1.jpg

58f5a723b5412_1928ThreepenceMamp8.jpg.94b6b7ba98849de636fb0a4c26ece6f9.jpg

58f5a723b9800_1928ThreepenceMamp8.jpg.19c457e09c9fe271067e3f05d59aace5.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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geejay50
The 1923 bronze is not scarce at all. It is common.

 

I forgot to mention that I also own one of the "red variety" 1923 farthings. It does not look like the 1D you bought but it definitely looks different from any other MS farthing I have owned or seen. However, NGC did not grade it "red" or even RB. They graded it brown (incorrectly in my opinion) and as an MS-62, it is worth far less than the $350 I paid for it.

 

Hi Ernesto,

 

Your comments on Coin Doctoring are of interest and thanks for your insights.

 

I have had in my collection some 1923 Proof Coppers that were very well doctored and in the early days of my hobby,I felt aggrieved that neither NGC or PCGS would grade these coins as red. if one looks at the pics shown however, the Penny has an obverse that is pretty and really 100% red but is somehow short of the lustre of its very scarce cousin , the 1930 Penny MS65RD. The reverse is a dead giveaway for artificial toning. One would realy like to know what substance was used to remove the blackening on the proof Penny without causing hairlines from rubbing? Coin doctors are well known for secrecy.There is a substance known as MS70 available in the USA that improves Copper coins without affecting lustre but it makes some of them bluish. We cant get that here.

 

I had graded for a fellow collector a 1923 Red Brown Proof Farthing some years back at NGC. I agree with you that it really didnt look like the normal Red Brown George V copper - unfortunately I dont have the pic of that coin.

 

Geejay

58f5a723d9f59_1923PennyRedL.jpg.7db8984712a8a40f11771421e350cda8.jpg

58f5a723deafc_1923PennyRedO.jpg.2b4d3b0edf8460ef44b064ca34ceebd2.jpg

58f5a723e393c_1923PennyRedR.jpg.472baf4648c99a47a2c759d5e5459a68.jpg

58f5a723e921e_1930PennyMS65RDamp.jpg.38ebfbdca89fb82ccc8bd9c1364c6866.jpg

58f5a723ed95b_1930PennyMS65RDamp.jpg.9f7c0e78b524b686c7ea5aee9c74bada.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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southernaurora

Hi Georg,

 

Thanks for keeping an eye on the population reports. Yes, the coin is mine and I'm really happy with the grade. Do you know of any high quality GEA coins for sale in South Africa? I'm always looking for exceptional coins and patterns.

 

Great thread and interesting posts!!

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geejay50

Hi Southernaurora,

 

You have an absolutely rare gem there and well done with the grade. That is a once in a lifetime coin.It would be interesting to know where it came from.

 

One doesnt see such GEA coins often anywhere in the world and I look far and wide.

 

There are a few GEA collectors in South Africa but it is really hard to find MS or Proofs here. USA seems to see more of that quality.That is where I have found that class of coin. The late Dr Frank Mitchell collected GEA and his son Rob sold some of these at a coin show a few years back. They were not all gradeable.

 

Geejay

Edited by geejay50

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geejay50

Hi Pierre,

 

The Third Party Grade report is really all we have to base our decision about what coin that is decent remains in the market. This must increasingly be true the further one goes back in time as the decent coins find their way into collections.

 

To quote from what you said above

 

'My point is, that if one bases your assumption on the scarcity of a certain coin on the NGC and PCGS grading stats solely, one might make a BIG mistake. '

 

I am not saying that surprises dont happen as the 1898 Red Penny ,1923 MS66 BN Penny hoards have shown.

 

If one takes a copy of say the 1927 Halfcrown pop report from NGC from four years back, the number of MS coins just doesnt change (3 from 16 coins graded). Serious collectors know this and hence IF such a coin arrives on the market, there is an absolute frenzy because it is a once in a lifetime experience for them.Such coins will never be found in a pile of Union coins because they would have been damaged in that pile. They have been painstakingly and lovingly looked after by the few farsighted collectors from way back in time. That insight , together with the obvious beauty of such a coin makes Numismatics such an attractive hobby/investment and so fundamentally different to the bullion price and its fickle ways.

 

The Poet John Keats wrote in 1818 ' A thing of beauty is a joy forever, its loveliness increases. It will never pass into nothingness ...' ('Endymion')

 

This 'loveliness' is expressed in an increasing price by the numismatic market when such coins are on offer. The slab and grader will hopefully prevent the coin from passing into nothingness.

 

Geejay

58f5a724042e0_1927HalfcrownMS6.jpg.6c7084e890d0660f463cc2dbe85780b3.jpg

58f5a72408b4e_1927HalfcrownMS6.jpg.fbae3d7c21564d9519474df125e546cf.jpg

58f5a7240d417_1927HalfcrownMS6.jpg.00915200d161df4f59373a740cb7833f.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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geejay50

The Circulated Griqua Coins - a Real Rarity,

 

Serious collectors are all well aware of the above coins issued by Rev Campbell from the London Misssionary Society (without consulting his directors - Becklake) roundabout 1815 and 1816 to the Griqua people in the Northern Cape . They are regarded as the first coins made specifically for indigenous South African people in history as separate from the Scheepjesguldens and fractions that the Dutch Napolenic Batavian Republic made for the Cape and the East in 1802.

 

That the copper coins were circulated in some form of trade is evidenced by their general condition which was poor to worn with very few in uncirculated condition. A corroded coin has been found in a hill outside Beaufort West. The literature is not specific about their value and it is generally regarded that they were of very limited use and being of low value were not worth talking or writing about. Similarly the early Greek and Roman coins do not have literature giving specific details of their usage but are accepted by all as circulated.

 

I have taken pictures of some examples of these Griqua coins from my collection to show their varying states of use, from Mint State to corroded . One even has a hole in it , presumably for easy carriage although pouches were commonly used for valuables at the time.

 

Five NGC/NCS graded/authenticated coins are shown, in order from left to right Three Halfpence MS62BN,VF35BN and VG details , Two Quarter Pence VF25 and Fair Corroded (the last you can almost not see the bird so the Reverse is shown only)The market is prepared to pay prices well in excess of any of the Lauer Griqua type Patterns that were made as salesman samples later in about 1890 and these circulated coins very seldom come up for sale. The coins have taken me four years to collect.

 

Geejay

58f5a72425724_1815GQTHalfpence.jpg.db11456e4e56daa9e4b5eaf1854d2d25.jpg

58f5a7242a032_1815GQTHalfpence.jpg.a85c527bda7619cf70fd40b5d752c259.jpg

58f5a7242e4e7_1815Griquahalfpamp1.jpg.db7939e417aa6c6451faf0b457275f11.jpg

58f5a724329c5_1815GriquaQuartamp10.jpg.5ad9dddf1c43ac481b1da3e630a67b78.jpg

58f5a72437705_1815GriquaQuartamp10.jpg.a5ab799c78202e8f54257ebdbf108916.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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geejay50

Hi Collectors,

I have a good friend with whom I work (maiden name De Wee) who is from the original Griqua people in Kokstad and we are putting out feelers to see if we can trace any remaining circulating Griqua coins through the older people in the town. I had a contact by the name of of Gert Kok but he passed away before I could meet him.

For completeness, some other pics of my small batch of these precious coins in the same order as before Halfpence MS62BN, VF35BN and VG holed, Quarter Pence VF25,Fair delails Corroded:

Geejay

58f5a7243c4bf_1815GQTHalfpence.jpg.dbbc4e177106fde889e9e10fb0aaf987.jpg

58f5a72440b20_1815GQTHalfpence.jpg.5b82aa20091a19c9061ccdfa72aa4873.jpg

58f5a7245c642_1815Griquahalfpamp1.jpg.59ddef549ae7ef9a4adbc57642ac174b.jpg

58f5a72460f36_1815GriquaQuartamp10.jpg.9f655e3d1ab50617d2da180ca7eeaa76.jpg

58f5a724653dc_1815GriquaQuartamp10.jpg.e772974228ca91c5fb5b454dc70bf000.jpg

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geejay50

Hi Collectors

 

Herewith pics of the slabs (NGC and NCS)

 

Geejay

58f5a72480df8_1815GQTHalfpence.jpg.4dd9d387d4e8ba3a1d6b3b4f0ab73a7e.jpg

58f5a72485bfc_1815GQTHalfpence.jpg.75d555c1359d6f84d7513bd14ecdc35c.jpg

58f5a7248a772_1815Griquahalfpamp1.jpg.790a5195412edb498952457bfa796a8d.jpg

58f5a7248e9a3_1815GriquaQuartamp10.jpg.7ddad8f2dc2eb9a89531cfa1df965b30.jpg

58f5a72496d1f_1815GriquaQuartamp10.jpg.15bbbdc6e5e740388ee0da683a9b61e0.jpg

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geejay50

1928 Halfpenny Rare and of variable strike

 

Hello Collectors,

 

This little copper coin is really a difficult coin to acquire in AU grade or better. It has a mintage of 104 912 and NGC has graded a mere 22 coins. PCGS hasnt graded any at all. There are only 4 coins in Mint State ( MS62-2, 63- 2) and 10 in AU. The rest go down to Fine.it is certainly much harder to find than its bigger cousin the 1928 Penny.

 

To make matters worse for both graders and collectors, the strike of this coin has been extremely soft at times on either the Obverse or Reverse so much so that the legend is partially struck.

 

This poor strike can easily be misinterpreted by the inexperienced as wear which it is not.

 

Herewith some pics of a graded XF45BN coin recently graded by NGC alongside an AU55 coin from my collection on the right with a far better obverse strike.

 

One can argue that the XF45 coin should have received at least AU50 if one compensates for the strike.I dont think it deserves a higher grade than that though - too much wear on the sails and face.

 

What do you think? Your input keeps this thread alive.

 

Geejay

58f5a724a2069_1928HalfpennyXFamp52.jpg.4a0b34ead0e858a86816a2d6be0be45a.jpg

58f5a724a6990_1928HalfpennyXFamp52.jpg.eb2c9928c4ed3ebb60eb7907435b37ba.jpg

58f5a724aae2f_1928HalfpennyXFamp52.jpg.ec0926f2ec49e89a4102a82ac6447cb0.jpg

58f5a724af74d_1928HalfpennyAUamp53.jpg.93e8933afc70db1564528800e2463a69.jpg

58f5a724b4308_1928HalfpennyAUamp53.jpg.ab5628056e4ac58b11655748ca6b822b.jpg

Edited by geejay50

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