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geejay50

Scarce Coin Watch

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jwither

Rhodesia 1977 half cent

 

I would like to discuss this coin today for a couple of reasons. First, because Rhodesia coins have been brought up before on this forum several times and I know that they are also bought by SA collectors. And second, because I believe that there are some misconceptions about these coins and others like them.

 

Heritage sold this particular coin last week in NGC AU-55 BN for $1645. (Why NGC opted to assign a color designation, I do not know. As discussed here once before, I have never seen a circulated coin\ with a RB or RD designation.) The listing described this coin as "very rare" ascribing it to most of the mintage being melted. I do not recall seeing this coin before but to put it kindly, I consider this price a very generous one. Here are my reasons:

 

First, the Krause manual lists the value at $800 in EF and $1500 in UNC. However, since these prices are not based upon actual sales, it does not matter what price it includes. The price might as well have been pulled out of a hat. My guess is that the bidder used the UNC price as the point of reference in this instance or if not, it sure is a co-incidence.

 

Second, there is really no way to know how many of these exist and this is not exactly a coin which is very highly collected. In my opinion, to be worth this kind of money, it would have to have less than five specimens known and maybe even be unique.

 

Third, I base this comment by comparing it to the Rhodesia proofs of 1968-1975. All of these coins have reported mintage of either 10 (most) or five (one or a few). Heritage does not list any recent sales but the last two were in 2008 for a 1968 3D PR-64 at $862 and a 1975 cent PR-65 RB for $373. I also tried checking DNW who I recall selling quite a few of these since 2008 but I find their archive retrieval very unreliable. I do not recall any of these selling for as much as this coin but if they did, it was likely for only slightly more. I do not see that most (if any) of these would sell for this price now unless the coin was really superior.

 

In the last five years, Heritage has also sold a pair of 1934 proofs, a 1956 proof penny and a 1954 proof set from Southern Rhodesia. All of these sold for less than this coin and all were much better quality. I do not know which are actually scarcer but I consider all of them more desirable than the coin which is the subject of this post.

 

Fourth, this bring me to my next point which is that this coin is not even in a very high grade and though it is a decent coin, it is not superior. You have heard me state that I think the grade should be given less priority than rarity but in this instance, these other coins are likely scarcer than the 1977 1/2c.

 

Fifth, since the market is really thin for coins like this one, there is no way to know how much it would sell for if offered again. In making this statement, I am not limiting it to this coin but any others like them because the liquidity is likely less (much worse) than for most scarce or rare Union.

 

On this board and in my recent exchange with a contributor on the NGC Message Boards, I have seen claims that presume that because a coin sold for a given price, that the price is reasonable because buyers must be informed and therefore will not overpay. There is no reason to believe such a claim whatsoever because it happens all the time and not just with coins.

 

Sometimes buyers get carried away with "auction fever", other times they make false assumptions about the scarcity and desirability of the coin they want to buy and other times, they want the coin regardless of whether they pay too much.

 

The reason why most buyers will make a false assumption with coins like this one is because there is no real reason for a non-collector to give it a second though it they happen to own it which is likely. In this instance, yes the catalogue price is high which makes it somewhat different but it is also a logical fallacy to assume that most people or even collectors (much less all of them) are rational and economic individuals who are always trying to maximize and squeeze every Rand or cent they can out of their collections.

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tlcoins

1931 Union Shilling

 

Hi Geejay

 

Just got the coin back from CGS. I chose to send it there as they are based in the UK and didn't want to send the coin to US due to high postage and possible loss. They are highly respected but rather conservative in their grading. They do however use a 1-100 scale rather than the usual sheldon scale of 1-70. There is a comparison chart to compare to. The Coin Grading Service : About the CGS Grading System

 

I'm quite happy with their grading, it came back as 45. Just have to sell it now.

 

Many Thanks

 

Tim

 

58f5a74960f5b_1931Shilling.JPG.4daf5ef54a04a6b2d634ea3b7bc6599d.JPG

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geejay50

Hi Tim,

 

Thanks for getting back to us on the grade. The CGS equates with AU53 on the Sheldon scale and if NGC aggrees, that will make this coin Pop1 overall (4 graded at NGC with the present best at XF45 and 1 graded at PCGS - G6).

 

I dont have experience with CGS and would welcome input from others who have.

 

Where are you going to sell it?

 

Regards

 

Geejay

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tlcoins

Hi Geejay

 

I was thinking of selling on ebay as i have not traded on BOB yet and I feel I need to build up some feedback on here first.

 

I'm still not sure whether to advertise at a fixed price or sell in an auction so any views would be much appreciated.

 

Many Thanks

 

Tim

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jwither

If you live in South Africa, I do not see that sending a coin to the US versus UK increases the risk of having the coin lost.

 

I do not own any CGS coins and have no data to compare their prices versus those from NGC or PCGS. However, I think you would realize a higher price in either of the latter.

 

As for where to sell it, I also think you might do better on a source like Heritage. I'm not sure what fees you might have to pay (possibly it could be none) and you will have to wait longer to get paid, but I think you might get more for it also.

 

When I sold most of my SA coins, I preferred to sell them myself because I wanted more control over the outcome. I also sold some of them at "buy it now" or through private sales and in retrospect, could have sold some or many for more.

 

The coin you have is desirable, but you also need to consider that the market is very weak right now (in my opinion) for most SA coins. Secondly, that there is no price reference for it because the Hern catalog certainly is not one. You will need to decide for yourself but I can tell you that I see many absurd prices on both BoB and eBay repeatedly (for less desirable coins I admit) which I see no chance of ever being paid.

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jwither

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tlcoins

Hi

 

Many thanks for your reply.

 

I am based in the uk which is why I chose to use CGS. I agree with you however that NGC & PCGS are more recognised worldwide and would probably result in a higher selling price. I do think CGS are much more conservative in their grading than the US companies, but it makes it difficult to compare the other graded coins due to the different scale used.

 

I would prefer to sell the coin myself for the same reasons that you stated but am struggling to decide on the right price for this particular coin. It's difficult to guage the rarity of the 1931 business strike as i haven't seen many for sale. Is it true that a large number were melted or is it no different to any other date?

 

Many Thanks

 

Tim

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jwither

I do not know how many of the 1931 shilling were melted and I do not believe anyone else does either. However, in my opinion, the apparent absolute scarcity of the coin versus the original recorded mintage of about 4800 indicates that many or even most were.

 

The combined census lists six (including your coin, four from NGC and one from PCGS). I have seen a few others ungraded that might or might not grade and have heard of one mint state example (also in the UK).

 

If I had to guess, I would say that this coin is probably an R-5 on the US Judd rarity scale (31-75 known) and probably in the middle. So say, maybe 50 known but I have nothing to back this estimate up. It is a guess but this coin is undenible scarce in any grade and rare in any better grade.

 

As for the price, if I were you, I would use the 1893 ZAR shilling as a baseline. It is a more common coin and i believe this coin should be worth more in comporable grade but not nearly as much as the apparent difference in the scarcity because ZAR is a lot more popular.

 

In terms of CGS grading standards, I cannot speak to them. All I know is that they are owned by London Coins and have bought coins from their auctions occasionally. If the same people who catalog the auctions are their graders, I would not consider them more conservative than either NGC or PCGS. My results with them in buying raw coins are a "mixed bag". I have bought some good coins from them but also some which I know NGC or PCGS would not grade once I had a chance to inspect them in person. I have no intention of buying any coin of significant value from them that is not graded by NGC or PCGS.

 

My opinion is that they are or might be conservative on the grade from the standpoint of wear but might also grade coins that NGC or PCGS will reject. This is a problem generally I have had with non-US auctions and the reason for it is likely that non-US buyers just have a different standard of "market acceptability". I make these comments having bought from London Coins, DNW, Baldwin's, Calico and one other Spanish firm. I Of these, I have the most confidence in DNW.

 

On your coin, what I can tell you is that, though I see no problems from the image, I personally would not pay the likely price you want without having the opportunity to inspect the coin in person first. I think a lot of buyers share that opinion.

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jwither

I am providing a reply here to the posts Pierre and SA Coinage recently exchanged elsewhere.

 

In late September, DNW is offering the most extensive selection of Union coins that I recall in many years. This should be a good indication on the current state of the market, or at least somewhat so.

 

I say "somewhat" because I suspect that some, many of most of the better MS coins to realize respectable or (relatively) strong prices while a disproportionate percentage of the others are likely to not even sell at all if the opening bids are too high, as i suspect many will be. There are many estimates that I see for coins that I believe will grade AU or low MS that I consider far too high.

 

For those who are collectors, I think the current market provides reasonable value. I still do not consider the "investment" specimens that compelling for the reasons I have provided before. If prices turn around, yes you may make money but I do not think the risk-reward trade off is particularly compelling at currently likely prices.

 

I myself will consider some purchases from this sale. I will primarily be looking to buy coins that are actually scarce which most others here do not want to buy because they will not receive the coveted MS grade.

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SA COINAGE

.......

Edited by SA COINAGE

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jwither

I think the QEII is scarce in better MS grades (MS-64 or better) for some of the 1/, 2/ and 2/6 but I do not believe the coin you used as an example is remotely worth that kind of price especially in today's market. It is a comment I have made about this series and many other coins that share similar characteristics. Given how weak the prices for so many Union coins are today, I consider it absurd. Just compare it to KGV and KGVI in the same grades. Many of those coins can be bought in that price range that are actually scarcer or much scarcer for around the same money. Some of these are also in the same grade range.

 

I bought a five coin set of 2/ dated 1956-1960 from Noble Numismatics earlier this year. They were ungraded as usual and I do not know what grades they will receive but I only paid $130 AUD which with buyer's fee and shipping came to about $200 AUD. They need conservation but I suspect that some or maybe even most of them will grade MS-64. I also have the 1953 in MS-65 and the 1960 (at least) in MS-64. The 1955 is scarcer than the 1960 but not really any more than the 1953, at least in the census. Previously, another 1953 in MS-65 sold for all of $15 on eBay. It was about a year or maybe 18 months ago. So while yes I think these coins are worth considering, I would not pay that kind of price or anywhere near it.

 

The same comments I made apply even more to the bronze. The coins you are describing are "grade rare" but this is no different than any other "conditional rarity". I do not consider any of these dates to be actually even scarce except in the narrow sense you describe.

 

These sets for the 1/, 2/ and 2/6 are on my list of coins to consider but not a priority. There are others that I am far more interested to pursue. The reason is that I believe I can always find these coins later and even if it is in a grade of MS-63, so what? The coins are not that different from an MS-64 and I do not believe the census is even close to complete in this grade.

 

The other thing you need to consider is that because of the poor strike quality, the coins might actually not receive the grades which are apparent in the image. The coins look good in the image and at least they are not intentionally misrepresented, but I have bought more than a few and when I received them, well...... I think you get the idea. If you are interested in those QEII lots, in my opinion, unless you are able to have someone represent you at auction, I would not "chase" them at much higher prices than the estimates.

 

The sale is on September 24. After it is over and I have either won my lots or failed to do so, I will add some more comments for the sale as a whole and I hope that others will do likewise.

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jicol

Would like to raise some views that tie in with Pierre's point before the post was moved.

 

The rise in the stock exchange may have contributed to collectors/investors moving from coins and it would be interesting if somebody with more data can plot the share index and average coin values to see if there is a strong correlation.That may be a useful predictive tool in the future.Mainly the share indexes are driven up by pension and investment funds that have billions to invest every month and with interest rates so low have nowhere else to go.Have anybody out there sold their collection or part of it to invest in shares?

 

The lack of disposable income must have contributed to less money being available to spend/invest in coins.2002 to 2007 house prices were going up by 10-15% per year and the banks were happy to make that available to you by increasing your bond(re-financing) which made a lot of disposable income available.Now the banks are stingy and those increased bonds have to be paid back taking disposable money out of the system again.Anybody out there who had to sell some of their collection to cover bond repayments?

 

With the initial decent prices of well graded coins,ZAR and Union, a lot of people were encouraged to send there long held coins in for grading and the populations have grown substantially.Now that the market is thin there are also a lot more well graded coins available and supply and demand will cause the prices to go down.The really scarce coins which will never have populations more than a very few are still selling for good prices like we recently saw for the 1932 Penny.

 

Then on to the dreaded gold and silver prices which I think have very little influence.For example a ZAR Pond of high AU/low MS will probably sell around R20 000 with some of the scarcer years for even more.The gold content makes up about R3500 of the coin.The gold price will have to move substantially to move the price of the coin.For silver it is even more so with the ZAR crowns only holding about R200 worth of silver.I do not have a lot of data but my perception is that last year when the gold price was still going up the ZAR Ponde were already moving down and now that gold has moved substantially down it have very little effect on the prices achieved for Ponde.

 

Once again it will be interesting to hear from anybody who have more data and please keep comments in context of the views expressed.

 

Jimmie

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jwither

Jimmie,

 

A sensible idea but I think the likelihood of coming to a meaningful conclusion for South African coins is not very likely. Taking the examples you gave, logically the gold and silver price should have no meaningful impact. However, I suspect it does if like the United States, "investors" use coins as substitutes for the metals. The difference between the two is that in South Africa, there are fewer coins which are realistic substitiutes, except from the 1994 and later issues.

 

The same more or less applies to property and shares. I agree with the reasoning you use, but I see no method to demonstrate it. While I think the "hard times" argument has some merit, ultimately because of the limited number of buyers for most South African coins, I think it comes down to fickle individual preference (how existing collectors want to spend the available funds they have) and individual financial circumstances (the fact or possibility that some or many existing collectors have encountered financial adversity). The census counts are also a factor but realistically, if your market had any depth, the current counts are still mostly low in an absolute sense. The one thing I believe that we can know with virtual certainty is that it sure isn't the current prices that are an obstacle because most sell for a relative pittance. It is only "conditional rarities" and the like which mostly do not.

 

The other consideration is the lack of liquidity. Given how infrequent so many South African coins (especially better Union) sell, how exactly would this even be measured? In the United States, there are (or were) two coin market indices, one for "investment" coins and another for "collector". I do not know the specifics but the first difference is that most of these coins presumably sell often enough in a specific grade to be meaningful. With South African coins, I believe that an equivalent could be constructed using the coins which sell the most often but it would not be representative of how most coins actually have or will perform.

 

For ZAR, examples include the 1892 and 1898 1D, 1898 Pond and some of the silver like the 1897 1/. For Union, the 1923 bronze and maybe the 1923 proof set and a few others.

 

To conclude, while I think the reasons you gave are all factors, I attribute most of the recent price weakness to simple "trend following" by "investors". They bought while prices were rising but since there apparently isn't and never was significant interest by actual collectors at previous prices, the air leaked out of that bubble and the result is what we see now, "investors" either stuck with coins for which they paid much more or that have been unloaded at a (significant) loss.

 

What I just said, this is the basis for my prior comments in my last post on those better grade QEII. That one 1955 NGC MS-64 2/, what exactly is so compelling about that coin that it should really be worth about $500 USD while so many actually better and scarcer Union coins sell for less or much less? (An example being the 1944 PCGS MS-64 BN ID which sold on eBay a few weeks ago for $62.) How much would one of the MS-63 realize if sold now? My guess is 10% or at most 20% of that price, maybe even less. The conclusion I reach about such a coin is that there are almost no real collectors who are going to pay that kind of price for it because it isn't deserved.

 

Logically, given what has happened to prices generally, you would think that buyers would learn their lesson but apparently, they never do. I expect that coin to either be sold at a loss later or if not, result in a very poor relative return.

Edited by jwither

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Pierre_Henri
Once again it will be interesting to hear from anybody who have more data and please keep comments in context of the views expressed.

 

Jimmie

 

100%

 

Logically, given what has happened to prices generally, you would think that buyers would learn their lesson but apparently, they never do. I expect that coin to either be sold at a loss later or if not, result in a very poor relative return

 

jwither

 

90% of coin-buyers on BoB (in my view) are currently burning their fingers terribly - but 10% are making a white wash as never seen before. They will be rewarded because they did their homework ...

 

These are our own Warren Buffettarians being way in front of the pack ...

 

Pierre

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alloway65

 

These are our own Warren Buffettarians being way in front of the pack ...

 

Pierre

 

Let us have some examples Pierre........educate us poor plebs!

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jwither

I believe that those who are buying coins at this time that are actually reasonably priced have a decent chance to make good returns, but I still think that these returns will be much less than those who bought early leading up to the 2011 peak. I started buying both ZAR and Union in quantity in 2004 and there are a few differences that I see between now and then.

 

First, the prices then were still much lower than now. The problem then was that because of this, the supply was also really low and this impeded the ability to take any meaningful position. Today though the supply of many indiividual coins is still low, collectively there is a lot more to buy. The second is that the census counts were much lower as Jimmie mentioned. And for whatever reason, a lot of buyers apparently assumed (incorrectly) that most coins were much scarcer than they have turned out to be.

 

As usual, the coins which I think represent the best values are not those that "investors" either do or seemingly want. That 1955 NGC MS-64 2/, there is an absolutely zero chance that I will ever pay $500 USD for it in today's market given what alternatives cost. The same applies for other coins like it, especially "conditional" rarities.

 

Yes, I think there is the opportunity to buy coins like this and "flip" them for a profit or sell them and make money occasionally if they are bought at a particularly attractive price. This will occur due to the wildly unpredictable nature of prices from one sale to the next for some coins.

 

But generically, I will say the same thing I have said multiple times before. If the collecting of coins is going to grow as a hobby in your country, then I do not see longer term how these "investment" coins are going to soar in price while all the others go nowhere. The "law of large number" works against this outcome. Combine this with my personal goal of actually completing my collection and that is why I am more interested in buying the scarcer coins in decent but still higher quality grades first for the relatively low prices which exist now.

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geejay50
Hi Geejay

 

Just got the coin back from CGS. I chose to send it there as they are based in the UK and didn't want to send the coin to US due to high postage and possible loss. They are highly respected but rather conservative in their grading. They do however use a 1-100 scale rather than the usual sheldon scale of 1-70. There is a comparison chart to compare to. The Coin Grading Service : About the CGS Grading System

 

I'm quite happy with their grading, it came back as 45. Just have to sell it now.

 

Many Thanks

 

Tim

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]4672[/ATTACH]

 

Hi Tim,

 

I remember now that two years ago in April 2011 I bought a 1928 Two Shilling on ebay from a seller mothZW in the UK graded by CGS as 75 which according to their comparison with the Sheldon Scale should be MS62/3 or 'Unc or nearly so'. I paid in Rands then R3798

 

I removed the coin from the holder and sent it to PCGS. It came back as XF45

 

I think we have to be cautious when calling a grading company 'Conservative' without evidence to support that. One can say that my one coin is not enough to judge a Company by but there is really a vast difference between XF45 and MS62.

 

I do feel after many cross overs and resubmissions between NGC and PCGS that their standards of grading are not far apart, whereas CGS is just another company too many in a market where we need consistency to stabilize prices vs grades.

 

The same goes for NNC, SANGS or SACGS. There have been too many errors in their grading to satisfy critical collectors/investors.

 

My own experience with ANACS has been good in terms of standards of grading and if only they gave a world coin population report, they would be competitive with NGC and PCGS. The current bias against ANACS in South Africa is unfair in my view.

 

Good luck with your coin

 

Geejay

Edited by geejay50

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cyberexchange

Scarce Coin Watch

 

100%

 

 

 

90% of coin-buyers on BoB (in my view) are currently burning their fingers terribly - but 10% are making a white wash as never seen before. They will be rewarded because they did their homework ...

 

These are our own Warren Buffettarians being way in front of the pack ...

 

Pierre

 

I concur with Pierre as 90% collectors/Investors are buying extremely high mintage coins with rare grades, even if the grade is in AU. Problem is, is that there is an unlimited supply of coins which could still be graded.You need only to look at the Mandela coins.

 

People have hoarded all the Mandela coins they have come across. All our bank notes now bear his image and for obvious reasons they cannot do likewise.

 

When considering buying a rare coin, always buy the best you can afford and keep it for a reasonable term as all markets are cyclical.

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jwither
When considering buying a rare coin, always buy the best you can afford and keep it for a reasonable term as all markets are cyclical.

 

In the United States where I live, this is also the advice frequently given. However, there is a big difference in the price structure between the two markets.

 

Buying the highest grade you can afford makes sense if the price differences between various grades are reasonable and the assigned grade is accurate. Though I agree with Geejay's post above, there are differences in quality for both NGC and PCGS coins even in the same grade which is something that I do not see SA collectors or "investors" ever consider. (That is why the CAC came into existence, in case no one here has ever heard of it.) And in the US, except for "conditional rarities", you are not going to see the exorbitant premiums which are so common for SA coins.

 

Even assuming that the grades are consistently applied, simply because a coin is a higher grade (which I am using as a proxy for quality since that is how most in SA apparently see it) absolutely does not make the coin a better "investment". It depends upon the relative prices. If anyone disagrees with this claim, then let them provide evidence to support it because I have provided numerous examples of the same date/denomination combination here where the prices are completely "out of whack".

 

What I describe is simply a function of basic math. As long as the lower grade coin is still a quality one, if the price variance between the two grades is exorbitant, then this is likely to reduce the pool of potential future buyers who are going to be willing to pay the existing owner enough to make a profit and certainly a meaningful one. The best chance I see for the buyer of a coin with an exorbitant multiple to do so is to hope for a "greater fool" to take it off of their hands. I do not see that as a particularly attractive "investment" strategy.

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jwither

Geejay,

 

Are you describing the coins in the old or new ANACS holders? If the former, I agree. If the latter, I am not so sure I do.

 

It is going to take a lot more than a population report to fix the problems ANACS has created mostly of their own doing. I still see more coins in their holders than other services outside of NGC and PCGS but they are not a factor at all. Since I do not collect US coins, I cannot tell you exactly what the current market perception is of their grading but I have never seen any comment on either the NGC Message Boards or PCGS Coin Forum which indicates that anyone views the coins in the new holders as comporable.

 

Basically, I see them having the same problems as I described for SANGS when this service was launched. The one difference is that ANACS was the market leader but lost their position. I have never seen any coin of significant value in a new ANACS holder (and I doubt there are any left in the old ones either) because the market perception of inferiority virtually guarantees that any accurately graded coin of any value is going to be bought at a discount, "cracked-out" and resubmitted to NGC or PCGS. (NGC itself has this problem versus PCGS on many US coins.) So if there was a population report, I do not see that it mould be of much use given that most (if not all) of the better coins would no longer be in their holders anyway.

Edited by jwither

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geejay50
Geejay,

 

Are you describing the coins in the old or new ANACS holders? If the former, I agree. If the latter, I am not so sure I do.

 

I cannot tell you exactly what the current market perception is of their grading but I have never seen any comment on either the NGC Message Boards or PCGS Coin Forum which indicates that anyone views the coins in the new holders as comporable.

 

I have never seen any coin of significant value in a new ANACS holder (and I doubt there are any left in the old ones either) because the market perception of inferiority virtually guarantees that any accurately graded coin of any value is going to be bought at a discount, "cracked-out" and resubmitted to NGC or PCGS. (NGC itself has this problem versus PCGS on many US coins.) So if there was a population report, I do not see that it mould be of much use given that most (if not all) of the better coins would no longer be in their holders anyway.

 

Hi Ernesto,

 

I dont think that ANACS is all that bad at grading and I have yet to see a cleaned coin that has been glossed over unlike the other inferior grading companies - (NNC is possibly the worst at the moment). The view that the old ANACS is better than the more recent (blue housing) or very recent (orange housing) I still think has not much to substantiate it.

 

I remember buying a few gold ZAR halfponden in orange ANACS capsules a few years ago at Heritage, had them crossed over and had little change in the NGC grade but I did not take pics at the time.

 

Recently I did get a nice coin that crossed over higher at NGC than it was in the ANACS capsule and I have the pics to share.

 

As I said before, one or two coins are not enough to get a good impression but every bit helps in scarce high quality coins.

 

I dont think NGC gives an MS65 easily.

 

Geejay

 

58f5a74a1098b_1948TwoShillingLogoANACSMS64.jpg.b3064fe85718949239671c993842e904.jpg

58f5a749a9f7d_1948TwoShillingLogoMS65.jpg.a7d22747bdfc90da0c1b60a541a1b891.jpg

58f5a749afbc9_1948TwoShillingObvMS65.jpg.52be444171d5b8a9ec18f6bf26720067.jpg

58f5a749b5472_1948TwoShillingRevMS65.jpg.bcca1b3726bbdde1e6cefc102bc72d42.jpg

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Pierre_Henri
Hi Ernesto,

 

I dont think that ANACS is all that bad at grading and I have yet to see a cleaned coin that has been glossed over unlike the other inferior grading companies - (NNC is possibly the worst at the moment). The view that the old ANACS is better than the more recent (blue housing) or very recent (orange housing) I still think has not much to substantiate it.

 

I remember buying a few gold ZAR halfponden in orange ANACS capsules a few years ago at Heritage, had them crossed over and had little change in the NGC grade but I did not take pics at the time.

 

Recently I did get a nice coin that crossed over higher at NGC than it was in the ANACS capsule and I have the pics to share.

 

As I said before, one or two coins are not enough to get a good impression but every bit helps in scarce high quality coins.

 

I dont think NGC gives an MS65 easily.

 

Geejay

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]4693[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]4694[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]4695[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]4696[/ATTACH]

 

In my humble Union collection - this 1948 2/- is one of two Two-shilling pieces (the other one being the previous year - 1947) absent in graded form

 

In MS - the 1947 and 1948 years are notoriously scarce so well done on an almost impossible coin to found in that grade!

Pierre

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geejay50
In my humble Union collection - this 1948 2/- is one of two Two-shilling pieces (the other one being the previous year - 1947) absent in graded form

 

In MS - the 1947 and 1948 years are notoriously scarce so well done on an almost impossible coin to found in that grade!

Pierre

 

Hi Pierre,

 

Here is the other Two Shilling you are looking for in an old ANACS capsule.

 

Perhaps we can have a few guesses at what NGC will grade it? I will send it in the next few weeks.

 

Geejay

 

58f5a74a28377_1947TwoShillingMS64ANACSRev.jpg.4b10b1fc3aa2c350655ee3253488b2fc.jpg

58f5a74a1ca1e_1947TwoShillingMS64ANACSLogo.jpg.9fa0fd22c8f31e1d035858b51d3ae0da.jpg

58f5a74a228fd_1947TwoShillingMS64ANACSObv.jpg.82fdc3e7340837d68516b3fdcef2b2c8.jpg

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JCO737

Does anyone have any info on this item:

 

Proof Sets - POP 1 FINNEST KNOWN 1937 5 SHILLING BRONZE RED!!!!NEAR PERFECT NGC PROOF 68 for sale in Jan Kempdorp (ID:108094081)

 

This is a 1937 5 Shilling depicting King Edward VIII who abdicated to George VI in December 1936 without any coinage with his image entering circulation in Britain or the Commonwealth countries.

 

It is NGC graded but I can't find any info on where this coin was minted or how many there are - even NGC does not have a pop report for it. Presumably this is some sort of commemorative coin minted in Britain.

 

Has anyone seen something like this before?

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jwither

Those 5/ are not a real coin at all. It is a "fantasy" issue struck at a much later date in various metals. The NGC pop report used to list it if not now and it is also included in the US Krause reference manual for the 20th century (or was).

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