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Consumer Protection Act - how are you going to change your business?

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Little Miss Muffet

The CPA has now requested that all marketeers must have a secondhand dealers licence.

If we sell secondhand items on Bob surely this applies to us too.

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brands online

This is rather interesting. This means that sellers need to look out for questions on all their items the whole day, most especially if it's Crazy Wednesdays or Snap Friday auctions, just in case any bidders "ask" to have their bids deleted. There's bound to be the idiots who mess around making sellers run around for nothing.

 

What happens if a buyer/buyers set auto bid limits which chase the price up and then "ask" for their bid to be deleted 2 mins before a Crazy Auction close and drive the price all the way back down to R1-00?

 

Example: IPAD starts at R1-00 on Crazy Auction. Buyer 1 places a bid @ R1-00. Buyer 2 places a bid at R100-00 with autobid to R10 000-00 ( Seller has no way of knowing the autobid). Buyer 3 drives the price up to let's say R3500-00, but are outbidded by Buyer 2's autobid. Auction closes at R23h00. At 22h40 on Wednesday night, Buyer 2 asks for their bid to be deleted via Q&A. Bid is deleted so price goes down to Buyer 3's lowest bid R200-00!!!

 

Sellers Cost of IPAD - R3000

Enhanced Advertising on Paid Promotion - R55

 

Loss: (R2855-00)

 

Of course, this might never happen, but we've been around long enough to know just how many crazies ARE out there...

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Seeds for Africa
This is rather interesting. This means that sellers need to look out for questions on all their items the whole day, most especially if it's Crazy Wednesdays or Snap Friday auctions, just in case any bidders "ask" to have their bids deleted. There's bound to be the idiots who mess around making sellers run around for nothing.

 

What happens if a buyer/buyers set auto bid limits which chase the price up and then "ask" for their bid to be deleted 2 mins before a Crazy Auction close and drive the price all the way back down to R1-00?

 

Example: IPAD starts at R1-00 on Crazy Auction. Buyer 1 places a bid @ R1-00. Buyer 2 places a bid at R100-00 with autobid to R10 000-00 ( Seller has no way of knowing the autobid). Buyer 3 drives the price up to let's say R3500-00, but are outbidded by Buyer 2's autobid. Auction closes at R23h00. At 22h40 on Wednesday night, Buyer 2 asks for their bid to be deleted via Q&A. Bid is deleted so price goes down to Buyer 3's lowest bid R200-00!!!

 

Sellers Cost of IPAD - R3000

Enhanced Advertising on Paid Promotion - R55

 

Loss: (R2855-00)

 

Of course, this might never happen, but we've been around long enough to know just how many crazies ARE out there...

 

You raise a very interesting question, and your example whilst you say may not happen is quite possible.

 

@kebs - You also raise a good point. one should have the ability to block people who constantly bid and then request deletions.

@lilythepink - I agree with you there. I would much rather delete a bid then have to deal with a buyer who doesnt want the item, and the subsequent SNC. Personally I have always deleted bids when requested to, however it still leaves the question of what do people not understand about "Your bid is a legally binding contract"?

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lilythepink

But I've been under the impression that selling secondhand goods on an auction does not incur the conditions of the CPA?!!

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Jacques Kuun

Hello all

 

This whole system is now open to abuse.

 

If two bidders (registered legitimately on BoB) are working together, the sellers will lose BIG money.

 

Take the following scenario: Bidders A and B are working together. The one puts in a bid of R2000-00 (Crazy auction) starting bid R1-00. Ten seconds later bidder B puts in a bid for R2010-00. The item now stands at R2010-00. Nobody else bids because the item is only worth R500-00. Thirty seconds before closing time, Bidder B asks for his bid to be deleted. The item sells at R1-00.

 

What a joke. Or do I understand things the wrong way?

 

Thanks and Regards

 

Jacques

Edited by dstorm

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Seeds for Africa
Hello all

This whole system is now open to abuse.

If two bidders (registered legitimately on BoB) are working together, the sellers will loose BIG money.

Take the following scenario: Bidders A and B are working together. The one puts in a bid of R2000-00 (Crazy auction) starting bid R1-00. Ten seconds later bidder B puts in a bid for R2010-00. The item now stands at R2010-00. Nobody else bids because the item is only worth R500-00. Thirty seconds before closing time, Bidder B asks for his bid to be deleted. The item sells at R1-00.

What a joke. Or do I understand things the wrong way?

Thanks and Regards

Jacques

 

I think you see it very clearly! It opens a can of worms!

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JPBon
But I've been under the impression that selling secondhand goods on an auction does not incur the conditions of the CPA?!!

 

you are actually very correct there so the buyers should also have their facts straight.

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admin
But I've been under the impression that selling secondhand goods on an auction does not incur the conditions of the CPA?!!

 

Hi Janet,

 

The Consumer Protection Act has to be read in conjunction with the Electronic Communications Transactions Act No.25 of 2002. Certain sections are covered by the Electronic Communications Transactions Act, as specified in the Consumer Protection Act. Here are a couple I came across in the CPA, don't know if I got all of them in the 94 page CPA.

 

FYI (in the CPA)

(3) A sale by auction is complete when the auctioneer announces its completion by the fall of the hammer, or in any other customary manner, and until that announcement is made, a bid may be retracted.

 

CPA :

Consumer’s right to cooling-off period after direct marketing

16. (1) This section does not apply to a transaction if section 44 of the Electronic Communications and Transactions Act applies to that transaction.

 

Electronic Communications and Transactions Act :

Scope of application

42. (1) This Chapter applies only to electronic transactions.

(2) Section 44 (Cooling-off period) does not apply to an electronic transaction-

a. for financial services, including but not limited to, investment services, insurance and reinsurance operations, banking services

and operations relating to dealings in securities;

b. by way of an auction;

 

CPA :

Consumer’s rights with respect to delivery of goods or supply of service

19. (1) This section does not apply to—

(a) the supply of goods or services to a franchisee in terms of a franchise

agreement; or

(b) a transaction if the performance of that transaction is governed by section 46

of the Electronic Communications and Transactions Act.

 

Electronic Communications and Transactions Act :

Performance

46.(1) The supplier must execute the order within 30 days after the day on which the supplier received the order, unless the parties have

agreed otherwise.

(2) Where a supplier has failed to execute the order within 30 days or within the agreed period, the consumer may cancel the

agreement with seven days' written notice.

(3) If a supplier is unable to perform in terms of the agreement on the grounds that the goods or services ordered are unavailable, the

supplier must immediately notify the consumer of this fact and refund any payments within 30 days after the date of such notification.

 

 

CPA :

Disclosure of price of goods or services

23. (1) This section does not apply to a transaction if—

(a) a supplier has provided an estimate pertaining to that transaction, or the

consumer has waived such an estimate, as contemplated in section 15; or

(b) section 43 of the Electronic Communications and Transactions Act applies to

that transaction.

 

Sales records

26. (1) This section does not apply to a transaction if—

(a) section 43 of the Electronic Communications and Transactions Act applies to

that transaction; or

 

Electronic Communications and Transactions Act :

Information to be provided

43. (1) A supplier offering goods or services for sale, for hire or for exchange by way of an electronic transaction must make the following information available to consumers on the web site where such goods or services are offered:

a. Its full name and legal status;

b. its physical address and telephone number;

c. its web site address and e-mail address;

d. membership of any self-regulatory or accreditation bodies to which that supplier belongs or subscribes and the contact details of that

body;

e. any code of conduct to which that supplier subscribes and how that code of conduct may be accessed electronically by the consumer;

f. in the case of a legal person, its registration number, the names of its office bearers and its place of registration;

g. the physical address where that supplier will receive legal service of documents;

h. a sufficient description of the main characteristics of the goods or services offered by that supplier to enable a consumer to make an

informed decision on the proposed electronic transaction;

i. the full price of the goods or services, including transport costs, taxes and any other fees or costs;

j. the manner of payment;

k. any terms of agreement, including any guarantees, that will apply to the transaction and how those terms may be accessed, stored

and reproduced electronically by consumers;

l. the time within which the goods will be dispatched or delivered or within which the services will be rendered;

m. the manner and period within which consumers can access and maintain a full record of the transaction;

n. the return, exchange and refund policy of that supplier;

o. any alternative dispute resolution code to which that supplier subscribes and how the wording of that code may be accessed

electronically by the consumer;

p. the security procedures and privacy policy of that supplier in respect of payment, payment information and personal information;

q. where appropriate, the minimum duration of the agreement in the case of agreements for the supply of products or services to be

performed on an ongoing basis or recurrently; and

r. the rights of consumers in terms of section 44, where applicable.

(2) The supplier must provide a consumer with an opportunitya.

to review the entire electronic transaction;

b. to correct any mistakes; and

c. to withdraw from the transaction, before finally placing any order.

(3) If a supplier fails to comply with the provisions of subsection (1) or (2), the consumer may cancel the transaction within 14 days of

receiving the goods or services under the transaction.

(4) If a transaction is cancelled in terms of subsection (3)-

a. the consumer must return the performance of the supplier or, where applicable, cease using the services performed; and

b. the supplier must refund all payments made by the consumer minus the direct cost of returning the goods.

(5) The supplier must utilise a payment system that is sutfrciently secure with reference to accepted technological standards at the

time of the transaction and the type of transaction concerned.

(6) The supplier is liable for any damage suffered by a consumer due to a failure by the supplier to comply with subsection (5).

 

CPA :

Catalogue marketing

33. (1) This section does not apply to—

(a) a franchise agreement; or

(b) a transaction if Chapter 7 of the Electronic Communications and Transactions

Act applies to it.

Edited by admin

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Jacques Kuun

FYI (in the CPA)

(3) A sale by auction is complete when the auctioneer announces its completion by the fall of the hammer, or in any other customary manner, and until that announcement is made, a bid may be retracted.

 

Does this constitute the end of the Crazy R1 auctions?

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admin

CHAPTER VII (Electronic Communications Transactions Act No.25 of 2002)

CONSUMER PROTECTION

 

Scope of application

42. (1) This Chapter applies only to electronic transactions.

(2) Section 44 does not apply to an electronic transaction-

a. for financial services, including but not limited to, investment services, insurance and reinsurance operations, banking services

and operations relating to dealings in securities;

b. by way of an auction;

c. for the supply of foodstuffs, beverages or other goods intended for everyday consumption supplied to the home, residence or

workplace of the consumer;

d. for services which began with the consumer's consent before the end of the seven-day period referred to in section 44(1);

e. where the price for the supply of goods or services is dependent on fluctuations in the financial markets and which cannot be

controlled by the supplier;

f. where the goods

i. are made to the consumer's specifications;

ii. are clearly personalised;

iii. by reason of their nature cannot be returned; or

iv. are likely to deteriorate or expire rapidly;

g. where audio or video recordings or computer software were unsealed by the consumer;

h. for the sale of newspapers, periodicals, magazines and books;

i. for the provision of gaming and lottery services; or

j. for the provision of accommodation, transport, catering or leisure services and where the supplier undertakes, when the

transaction is concluded, to provide these services on a specific date or within a specific period.

(3) This Chapter does not apply to a regulatory authority established in terms of a law if that law prescribes consumer protection

provisions in respect of electronic transactions.

 

Information to be provided

43. (1) A supplier offering goods or services for sale, for hire or for exchange by way of an electronic transaction must make the following information available to consumers on the web site where such goods or services are offered:

a. Its full name and legal status;

b. its physical address and telephone number;

c. its web site address and e-mail address;

d. membership of any self-regulatory or accreditation bodies to which that supplier belongs or subscribes and the contact details of that

body;

e. any code of conduct to which that supplier subscribes and how that code of conduct may be accessed electronically by the consumer;

f. in the case of a legal person, its registration number, the names of its office bearers and its place of registration;

g. the physical address where that supplier will receive legal service of documents;

h. a sufficient description of the main characteristics of the goods or services offered by that supplier to enable a consumer to make an

informed decision on the proposed electronic transaction;

i. the full price of the goods or services, including transport costs, taxes and any other fees or costs;

j. the manner of payment;

k. any terms of agreement, including any guarantees, that will apply to the transaction and how those terms may be accessed, stored

and reproduced electronically by consumers;

l. the time within which the goods will be dispatched or delivered or within which the services will be rendered;

m. the manner and period within which consumers can access and maintain a full record of the transaction;

n. the return, exchange and refund policy of that supplier;

o. any alternative dispute resolution code to which that supplier subscribes and how the wording of that code may be accessed

electronically by the consumer;

p. the security procedures and privacy policy of that supplier in respect of payment, payment information and personal information;

q. where appropriate, the minimum duration of the agreement in the case of agreements for the supply of products or services to be

performed on an ongoing basis or recurrently; and

r. the rights of consumers in terms of section 44, where applicable.

(2) The supplier must provide a consumer with an opportunitya.

to review the entire electronic transaction;

b. to correct any mistakes; and

c. to withdraw from the transaction, before finally placing any order.

(3) If a supplier fails to comply with the provisions of subsection (1) or (2), the consumer may cancel the transaction within 14 days of

receiving the goods or services under the transaction.

(4) If a transaction is cancelled in terms of subsection (3)-

a. the consumer must return the performance of the supplier or, where applicable, cease using the services performed; and

b. the supplier must refund all payments made by the consumer minus the direct cost of returning the goods.

(5) The supplier must utilise a payment system that is sutfrciently secure with reference to accepted technological standards at the

time of the transaction and the type of transaction concerned.

(6) The supplier is liable for any damage suffered by a consumer due to a failure by the supplier to comply with subsection (5).

 

Cooling-off period

44. (1) A consumer is entitled to cancel without reason and without penalty any transaction and any related credit agreement for the supply-

a. of goods within seven days after the date of the receipt of the goods; or

b. of services within seven days after the date of the conclusion of the agreement.

(2) The only charge that may be levied on the consumer is the direct cost of returning the goods.

(3) If payment for the goods or services has been effected prior to a consumer exercising a right referred to in subsection ( I ), the

consumer is entitled to a full refund of' such payment, which refund must be made within 30 days of the date of cancellation.

(4) This section must not be construed as prejudicing the rights of a consumer provided for in any other law.

 

Unsolicited goods, services or communications

45. (1) Any person who sends unsolicited commercial communications to consumers, must provide the consumera.

with the option to cancel his or her subscription to the mailing list of that person; and

b. with the identifying particulars of the source from which that person obtained the consumer's personal information, on request of

the consumer.

(2) No agreement is concluded where a consumer has failed to respond to an unsolicited communication.

(3) Any person who fails to comply with or contravenes subsection (1) is guilty of an offence and liable, on conviction, to the penalties

prescribed in section 89(1).

(4) Any person who sends unsolicited commercial communications to a person who has advised the sender that such communications

are unwelcome, is guilty of an offence and liable, on conviction, to the penalties prescribed in section 89(1).

 

Performance

46. (1) The supplier must execute the order within 30 days after the day on which the supplier received the order, unless the parties have

agreed otherwise .

(2) Where a supplier has failed to execute the order within 30 days or within the agreed period, the consumer may cancel the

agreement with seven days' written notice.

(3) If a supplier is unable to perform in terms of the agreement on the grounds that the goods or services ordered are unavailable, the

supplier must immediately notify the consumer of this fact and refund any payments within 30 days after the date of such notification.

 

Applicability of foreign law

47. The protection provided to consumers in this Chapter, applies irrespective of the legal system applicable to the agreement in question.

 

Non-exclusion

48. Any provision in an agreement which excludes any rights provided for in this Chapter is null and void.

 

Complaints to Consumer Affairs Committee

49. A consumer may lodge a complaint with the Consumer Affairs Committee in respect of any non-compliance with the provisions of this Chapter

by a supplier.

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Little Miss Muffet

And Bla!! Bla!! Bla.!!!:biggrin: Forget the CPA

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lilythepink

Thanks a ton for all the information, Andries. You've taken a lot of trouble.

 

And I agree with Pammie's comment - forget the CPA - until it has been tried and tested (and loopholes closed). (I am also under the impression that small businesses with under R3 000 000.00 turnover per year will not be included in this Act. Not sure where I read that though!)

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Wild Olive Art
Thanks a ton for all the information, Andries. You've taken a lot of trouble.

 

And I agree with Pammie's comment - forget the CPA - until it has been tried and tested (and loopholes closed). (I am also under the impression that small businesses with under R3 000 000.00 turnover per year will not be included in this Act. Not sure where I read that though!)

 

The CPA applies to everyone ( small business is not exempt), whether as a supplier, consumer or otherwise, albeit in different instances and to differing degrees. For safety’s sake, it should also always be assumed that the Act will apply to any transaction entered into in the ordinary course of business.

 

It is not a smart idea at all to ignore or forget the CPA . It really is not that difficult to comply and definitely not worth the headache of having to deal with belligerent customers who might get smart and claim refunds because a listing was not compliant with the Act ! ( they're out there!)

 

 

The CPA does not apply to*:

 

Supply of goods or services to the State;

Any transaction where the consumer is a juristic person whose asset value or annual turnover at the time of the transaction equals or exceeds the threshold value determined by the Minister;

Transactions within an exemption granted by the Minister ***;

Services regulated by the Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act, 2002;

Services regulated by the Long and Short Term Insurance Acts,1998**

A credit agreement under the National Credit Act, 2005 but the goods or services that are the subject of the credit agreement are not excluded from the CPA;

Services supplied under an employment contract; and

A transaction giving effect to a collective bargaining agreement or collective agreement .

* The provisions in the Act regarding safety monitoring and recall (section 60), and liability for damages caused by goods (section 61) apply to all transactions, even transactions exempted from the application of the Act.

** The CPA prescribes that the Acts must be aligned with the consumer protection measures in the CPA within 18 months from the commencement. If this is not done, the provisions of the CPA will apply to all services rendered in terms of the Long and Short Term Insurance Acts, 1998.

*** A regulatory authority may apply to the Minister for an industry-wide exemption from one or more provisions of the CPA on the grounds that the provisions overlap or duplicate a regulatory scheme administered by that regulatory authority in terms of national legislation; or any treaty, international law convention or protoco

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kebs

"Any transaction where the consumer is a juristic person whose asset value or annual turnover at the time of the transaction equals or exceeds the threshold value determined by the Minister;"

Anyone know what this amount is?

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Wild Olive Art

It has to be individually calculated as far as I understand.

 

In terms of section 6(1) of the Consumer Protection Act, 2008 (Act No. 68 of 2008) (‘the Act”), the Minister of the Department of Trade and Industry, by notice in the Gazette, must determine a monetary threshold applicable to the size of the juristic person for the purposes of the section 5(2) (b). In terms of section 5(2)(b) thereof, the Act does not apply to any transaction in terms of which the consumer is a juristic person whose asset value or annual turnover, at the time of the transaction equals or exceeds the threshold value determined by the Minister in terms of Section 6.

 

http://us-cdn.creamermedia.co.za/assets/articles/attachments/32645_n294.pdf

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kebs

Yikes! I think I need to study law for all this.... :shock:

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Jacques Kuun

Hello all

I agree that many things seem to be a shade of grey.

Yet the “deleting of bids” seems to be written in black.

BoB is very much about BIDDING.

So I do not understand the post from geewhizz: “And Bla!! Bla!! Bla.!!! Forget the CPA”.

If we do not delete the bid, BoB will do it. How do we forget this?

Regards

Jacques

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Little Miss Muffet
Hello all

 

I agree that many things seem to be a shade of grey.

 

Yet the “deleting of bids” seems to be written in black.

 

BoB is very much about BIDDING.

 

So I do not understand the post from geewhizz: “And Bla!! Bla!! Bla.!!! Forget the CPA”.

 

If we do not delete the bid, BoB will do it. How do we forget this?

 

Regards

 

Jacques

Bla!! Bla!! Bla!! was meant injest. Too much of admins post to read and digest.

How exactly are they going to police people who market.

They dont have the work force to go around and check on every item being sold on a market.

Marketeers are expected to record every item they purchase and have a record of where it was bought or from whom. Totally impractical since a often it is bought on the market or in a shop.

Are they going to get receipts from everyone. Bla!! Bla!! Bla!!

I cant see any increase in buyers asking for bids to be deleted. Most people bid because they want the item.Users are not going to take advantage of a new law or rather change their activities on Bob because of some law that is being introduced.

I, for one, have very few people asking for a bid to be deleted but when I am asked I delete the bid and move on.Why be difficult? If someone has changed their mind then they have changed their mind.

The CPA can also work to the benefit of those who have been misled where an auction is concerned.

Edited by geewhizz

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brands online
This is rather interesting. This means that sellers need to look out for questions on all their items the whole day, most especially if it's Crazy Wednesdays or Snap Friday auctions, just in case any bidders "ask" to have their bids deleted. There's bound to be the idiots who mess around making sellers run around for nothing.

 

What happens if a buyer/buyers set auto bid limits which chase the price up and then "ask" for their bid to be deleted 2 mins before a Crazy Auction close and drive the price all the way back down to R1-00?

 

Example: IPAD starts at R1-00 on Crazy Auction. Buyer 1 places a bid @ R1-00. Buyer 2 places a bid at R100-00 with autobid to R10 000-00 ( Seller has no way of knowing the autobid). Buyer 3 drives the price up to let's say R3500-00, but are outbidded by Buyer 2's autobid. Auction closes at R23h00. At 22h40 on Wednesday night, Buyer 2 asks for their bid to be deleted via Q&A. Bid is deleted so price goes down to Buyer 3's lowest bid R200-00!!!

 

Sellers Cost of IPAD - R3000

Enhanced Advertising on Paid Promotion - R55

 

Loss: (R2855-00)

 

Hello all

 

This whole system is now open to abuse.

 

If two bidders (registered legitimately on BoB) are working together, the sellers will lose BIG money.

 

Take the following scenario: Bidders A and B are working together. The one puts in a bid of R2000-00 (Crazy auction) starting bid R1-00. Ten seconds later bidder B puts in a bid for R2010-00. The item now stands at R2010-00. Nobody else bids because the item is only worth R500-00. Thirty seconds before closing time, Bidder B asks for his bid to be deleted. The item sells at R1-00.

 

What a joke. Or do I understand things the wrong way?

 

Thanks and Regards

 

Jacques

 

FYI (in the CPA)

(3) A sale by auction is complete when the auctioneer announces its completion by the fall of the hammer, or in any other customary manner, and until that announcement is made, a bid may be retracted.

 

Does this constitute the end of the Crazy R1 auctions?

 

Can the above instances occur and what if any recourses are then available for seller's? Obviously the long term effect is the end of Crazy auctions if buyers can delete their bids. If someone from BOB can perhaps tell us in simple terms, without all the actual pasting of the Act, that would certainly help us well. Crazy Wednesdays open tomorrow again, so the advice is appreciated. Thanks:worried:

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lilythepink

Cuan - let's have some answers to the very pertinent questions raised above. Please?!

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qball

Hi Guys

 

Again, this is being blown way out of proportion. There is no need to panic or get your knickers in a knot... :bigsmile:

 

It's pretty simple. In the "old" days, the bidder would renege on the deal any way - i.o.w. not pay when the auction closed. Would you rather remove the bid and save yourself the trouble of filing a SNC and trying get payment from the bidder? If they ask for the bid to be removed, remove it and save yourself the hassle after the auction closes. When you remove the bid, the item is still open and may possibly still have active bidders. I think you should look at it from this angle and not how the CPA is going to lead to the end of auctions. We do not believe this will be a widespread problem nor will it mean the end of these auctions. Rather think of it as "preventative maintenance". We will still monitor shill bidding, but there is no 100% fool proof way to guarantee against this.

 

Kind regards

Cuan

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brands online

Thanks Cuan, which basically means that the examples below CAN happen?

 

Can BOB not then alter the code somewhat so that if ther is a buyer with an Autobid like below, then the next buyer in line would get it at their highest bid, instead of their lowest? This could be added to the terms and conditions of buying on BOB and would alleviate seller's worrying about aforementioned examples somewhat?

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qball

Unfortunately we will not be changing the auction logic or software.

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Little Miss Muffet
Can the above instances occur and what if any recourses are then available for seller's? Obviously the long term effect is the end of Crazy auctions if buyers can delete their bids. If someone from BOB can perhaps tell us in simple terms, without all the actual pasting of the Act, that would certainly help us well. Crazy Wednesdays open tomorrow again, so the advice is appreciated. Thanks:worried:

Your quote in blue does not,as I have read it,apply to online auctions (Cooling off period) if you read admins post directly below your quote.

 

Sorry can someone tell me how to extract only parts of a post.

I wanted to add this but did not know how.

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BeadsandBaubles

Hi

 

 

"Performance

46. (1) The supplier must execute the order within 30 days after the day on which the supplier received the order, unless the parties have

agreed otherwise .

(2) Where a supplier has failed to execute the order within 30 days or within the agreed period, the consumer may cancel the

agreement with seven days' written notice.

(3) If a supplier is unable to perform in terms of the agreement on the grounds that the goods or services ordered are unavailable, the

supplier must immediately notify the consumer of this fact and refund any payments within 30 days after the date of such notification."

 

Does this mean that delivery dates can be extended to 30 days? ie the buyer would not be able to file an SNC until after 30 days has passed?

 

Also the wording states execute the order within 30 days after the day on which the supplier received the order, unless the parties have agreed otherwise . The word can be construed as the day on which it is posted/executed, not the delivery day, not so? If this is the case the buyer would then have to add 30 days (to execution/postage/courier) plus another few days (for the delivery)???

 

I for one would not mind selling in this manner as most of my customers order through the month and then make a payday payment. As I sell in the craft section as a "hobby" and to share my craft, and do not rely on the income, it is not a full time business for me and I have other interests that keep me busy as well - thus limiting my time online. Sellers should be offered an opportunity to sell in this manner - sort of like many subscription websites are selling - take for instance Leisure Books- when I place an order with them, I have to wait the subscription period out before receiving my parcel.

 

I strongly believe that bidorbuy should offer a "subscription" type of service ie deliverable on a monthly basis - running around counting beads and tiny things on a "daily" basis, packing and parcelling these tiny goodies daily, and having to rush off to the PO before a customer becomes irated is really hell on us sellers of these tiny goodies, especially in the craft section.

 

I would be able to better consolidate and manage my sales were I able to select certain days of the month for certain duties, and please remember anyone selling the higher priced items, before you make any critical assessment, place yourself in the shoes of the craft sellers having to sit for countless hours stringing, counting, weighing, packing before being able to get down to the job of actually listing and selling.

 

I have added this thread to the craft section as well.

 

Thanks

Sandy

 

PS - Some of those beads come in bags of 100,000 - just think of the time it takes to string them neatly or bag them for our buyers, speaking for myself I would like to have a few days uninterupted by irate buyers just to do this.

Edited by BeadsandBaubles
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