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Numzaan

Help in definition please

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Numzaan    10
Numzaan

In the gemstone market on BidorBuy under the "treatment" heading there is a reference to "Diffused." - what does the actual process of diffusion entail? This novice would appreciate some education from the "old timers" please.

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Numzaan    10
Numzaan

Answer from EBay. THis novice has been taken in!!!!!

 

A diffusion treated stone; in essence its surface layer has been dyed.

 

There are the pictures: lovely, juicy colours that make one's mouth water

and that one absolutely must have - and then there are the descriptions,

sometimes indicated as "treatment" and sometimes merely thrown into the short

paragraph, that say these are diffusion gems.

 

 

Diffusion treatment is fraudulent colouring of poor quality stones to make

them appear of a higher grade. Undoubtedly there are many people who would not

care how that fifteen-carat ruby got to be so red, if they can buy it for a

hundred dollars or so. But for the serious buyers of stones - whether for

themselves, as a gift, or use in their business - that word should be a red

flag.

 

 

The sad truth about these stones is this:

 

 

"Tragically, these altered gems defy categorization as natural or even

legitimately enhanced. They fall outside all existing gemological

classifications into a new order of mutant minerals that have less

authenticity as gems than synthetics." [emphasis added]

-

Jewelry Show Guide

 

 

Diffusion stones are coloured by the forced introduction of dyes into the

stones in order to produce the mirage of a wonderful pigeon blood ruby when what

one has is poor quality corundum that has been dyed.

 

 

Diffusion - as the experts point out - reduces the actual gemstone material

to a substrate. The colour could as easily be forced into the pores of some

lead glass or even plastic blanks that then are put into ebay or elsewhere

online.

 

 

It is difficult enough to find untreated gemstones. Some have been enhanced

for so many centuries - emeralds, for example, are virtually always oiled - that

it is a given assumption that all specimens have been treated. Many of the more

fragile stones nowadays have their ctracks filled with lead glass. Others are

heated, or have imperfections lasered out of their middle, or are bombarded with

radiation - which makes for dangerous stones. In the 1920s people were

entranced by their newest toy, uranium, and a number of large diamonds were

ruined for the foreseeable future by being exposed to uranium to colour them

green. These highly radioactive stones now inhabit boxes thickly lined in lead

and will continue to do so for tens of thousands of years.

 

 

The honest, scrupulous dealer will tell you not just how heavy it is, how

large it is, etc., but whether the stone on offer has been treated in any way.

Acceptable descriptions include "assumed to be treated with cedar oil"

(emeralds) or "heated", whereas "enhanced" should be flagged, if there is no

description of the enhancement, which could include diffusion.

 

 

The other factor in this activity is always the knowledge (or ignorance) of

the buyer. If you are anticipating making some gemstone purchases you should

have a basic understanding of the market, including the fact that many of the

names still used are meaningless - such as "London Topaz" - a topaz whose colour

has been made blue by being irradiated and/or cooked, "Mystic Topaz" is coated

with a metal film and most pink topaz similarly is coated. Instead of letting

oneself be swayed by the iridescence of a "Mystic Topaz" one could be looking at

a beautifully cut, richly coloured Imperial Topaz, which occupies the

pinkish-orange range.

 

 

 

An hour's reading can give you sufficient background information to know that

- even if it is not there - the little warning flag should be waving wildly when

you come across the word "diffusion" in a gemstone listing.

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Cali Craft and Gems    10
Cali Craft and Gems

In addition to the explanation you have provided, one thing that was omitted is the clarity of the gems concerned. The full diffusion is applicable on the IF gems - lab enhanced, colour treated, hydrothermal, what-ever you want to call it. On VS and VVS gems, the diffusion process is sometimes used to enhance / strengthen the clarity and colour. (this information is from my international supplier and is not my personal opinion / knowledge as there is so much to be discovered on the subject - it is not limited to one single discussion).

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Numzaan    10
Numzaan

Diffusion

 

Thank you all for your advice. I smelt a rat when I saw the size of the gem offered but thought that the small price paid wasworth the effort. You have correctly diagnosed the situation. I have been well and truly suckered. I guess that I am not the first and wont be the last. Once again, thank you so much for your responses.

Cheers

Numzaan

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Lukeness    10
Lukeness

Diffusion is not necessarily a bad thing. Treatments like this allow ordinary consumers to be able to afford natural (as in mined) gemstones with characteristics of stones that only the mega-wealthy could, and will, ever afford. The important thing is that the treatment is fully disclosed to the consumer so that they are not led to believe that they are actually buying that impossibly valuable gemstone for peanuts. At the same time, buyers cannot expect sellers to every interested customer so if the seller is disclosing a treatment, common sense should dictate that the buyer asks questions about it if they have any.

 

Diffused stones are natural gemstones that are heated in the presence of certain elements that penetrate the stone and enhance, or even alter the colour of the gem. It only enhances clarity as much as would be done by heating.

 

This might sound drastic, until one realizes that even simple, and widespread to the point of it being the norm, heating can do the same to certain gems.

Purple Amethyst is heated to Yellow/Orange Citrine, Aquamarine is heated to remove the yellow and turn it blue, rather than greenish Blue, light Brown Topaz is heated to turn it a more attractive Pink, Brown Zircons are heated to turn Blue or Orange.

 

As long as the treatments are disclosed so that you can make an informed buying decision, there is nothing wrong with gem treatments. They make beauty affordable. And that's exactly what gems are about: Beauty. They are still natural gems.

 

'Hydrothermal' gems are lab created stones.

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chizzy2k    10
chizzy2k

Hi Lukeness. I see the important thing is to discose fully, the treatment of the stones to potential buyers...

I have just bought 2 stones from (wont mention names) both of which were valued by GISA at R78k and R48k respectfully.

I thought it was too good to be true, which it turns out it was.

I would love to know where I could sell these gems for anything near what I paid for them as upon taking them to an Opal dealer in Cape Town, I was informed that these stones were worth (to him, wholesale dealer) R2000 and R1000 each respectivley.

I feel lilke I have been swindled :)

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Lukeness    10
Lukeness

Dear Chizzy2k,

 

I'm a little confused as we conversed over email just yesterday, after which you thanked me for explaining things to you. As I explained, a wholesale dealer would offer you only a fraction of retail. There are several levels of wholesale and I put together a typical scenario that I believe illustrated quite clearly that over these various levels of wholesale dealers and cutters etc, each of whom add profit margins (often several 100 percent) and incur their own costs, the values rise quite dramatically.

I don't know how much you paid for them, so I cannot answer your question about selling the stone. But wholesale dealers need to make profits to, so it is highly unlikely that you would fetch high prices from them.

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SADiamondsrus    10
SADiamondsrus
Diffusion is not necessarily a bad thing. Treatments like this allow ordinary consumers to be able to afford natural (as in mined) gemstones with characteristics of stones that only the mega-wealthy could, and will, ever afford. The important thing is that the treatment is fully disclosed to the consumer so that they are not led to believe that they are actually buying that impossibly valuable gemstone for peanuts. At the same time, buyers cannot expect sellers to every interested customer so if the seller is disclosing a treatment, common sense should dictate that the buyer asks questions about it if they have any.

 

Diffused stones are natural gemstones that are heated in the presence of certain elements that penetrate the stone and enhance, or even alter the colour of the gem. It only enhances clarity as much as would be done by heating.

 

This might sound drastic, until one realizes that even simple, and widespread to the point of it being the norm, heating can do the same to certain gems.

Purple Amethyst is heated to Yellow/Orange Citrine, Aquamarine is heated to remove the yellow and turn it blue, rather than greenish Blue, light Brown Topaz is heated to turn it a more attractive Pink, Brown Zircons are heated to turn Blue or Orange.

 

As long as the treatments are disclosed so that you can make an informed buying decision, there is nothing wrong with gem treatments. They make beauty affordable. And that's exactly what gems are about: Beauty. They are still natural gems.

 

'Hydrothermal' gems are lab created stones.

 

Fully agree with this and the diffusion does not make the gem not natural, but lesser in value yes.

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