Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
MsPlod

Natural or dyed?

Recommended Posts

MsPlod
watermelon101

Natural or Dyed?

 

Hi MsPlod,

 

These stones seems like Brazilian Dyed Agates - maybe the seller should clarify - I tried to ask the question, only to find my questions have been deleted and never answered

 

Another question would relate to the classification of gemstones- when a stone is drilled - is it not normally classified as a bead rather than a gemstone, which is cut? :wtf:

 

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cali Craft and Gems

Natural "unworked" Agate comes in pale grey, brown, etc - earthy natural colours. Agate that is dyed is available in all sorts of colours - pink, purple, blue, green, red, teal, black, etc.

 

I agree with Watermelon101 though that it should be stated in the listing under Treatment!

 

I didn't bother querying it with the seller though as it seems lately every time I give advice, I get blasted in return! (the seller who had been listing Alexandrite under Diamonds, politely looked up my cell number, called me and put down when I answered, only to follow up with a nasty SMS telling me to mind my own business!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MsPlod
These stones seems like Brazilian Dyed Agates - maybe the seller should clarify - I tried to ask the question, only to find my questions have been deleted and never answered

That is a bad show - bit of a pity but intrigued to see that she would not respond to a question which is key to the gemstone's integrity!

Another question would relate to the classification of gemstones- when a stone is drilled - is it not normally classified as a bead rather than a gemstone, which is cut? :wtf:

Not sure - guess so, I think that BoB allows a certain latitude with this - but I could be wrong LOL!

Natural "unworked" Agate comes in pale grey, brown, etc - earthy natural colours. Agate that is dyed is available in all sorts of colours - pink, purple, blue, green, red, teal, black, etc.

That is what I thought, but bought some of these brightly coloured stones believing that there had been no treatment, then had second thoughts about it so was interested to find out what the fundis think - very grateful to get the input Watermelon101 and CCG!!

I agree with Watermelon101 though that it should be stated in the listing under Treatment!

That seriously makes three of us!

I didn't bother querying it with the seller though as it seems lately every time I give advice, I get blasted in return! (the seller who had been listing Alexandrite under Diamonds, politely looked up my cell number, called me and put down when I answered, only to follow up with a nasty SMS telling me to mind my own business!)

Hmmmmmmmmmmm!!!??!!! That IS a very bad show!

Edited by MsPlod
Punctuation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lukeness

I think it's worth mentioning that agate dying is also often standard practice. Onyx, for example, is banded agate, traditionally treated with honey (not unlike the sugar treatment of boulder/matrix opal) to turn it black. Lately, the colours seem brighter than ever.

 

As far as gems vs beads: Yes, drilled stones are beads, but they are still gems. Gems are not always faceted and beading is simply one of the earliest uses of a gemstone still in practice today. Of course this is only valid if the stones would be considered gems in the first place.

 

Do they meet the standard criteria (they should meet at least two of the following three)?

 

Is it beautiful (this is obviously subjective)?

Is it rare?

Is it durable?

 

To me dyed agates would not really fit here as while they are very pretty, the beauty is mostly manufactured (this is personal preference). Yes, some agates are beautiful, but these are more often in the category of decorative or ornamental stones rather than gems. They are not rare at all; although they are fairly durable.

Edited by Lukeness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MsPlod

Thank you for commenting!

 

I think it's worth mentioning that agate dying is also often standard practice. Onyx, for example, is banded agate, traditionally treated with honey (not unlike the sugar treatment of boulder/matrix opal) to turn it black. Lately, the colours seem brighter than ever.

 

As far as gems vs beads: Yes, drilled stones are beads, but they are still gems. Gems are not always faceted and beading is simply one of the earliest uses of a gemstone still in practice today. Of course this is only valid if the stones would be considered gems in the first place.

 

Do they meet the standard criteria (they should meet at least two of the following three)?

 

Is it beautiful (this is obviously subjective)?

Is it rare?

Is it durable?

 

To me dyed agates would not really fit here as while they are very pretty, the beauty is mostly manufactured (this is personal preference). Yes, some agates are beautiful, but these are more often in the category of decorative or ornamental stones rather than gems. They are not rare at all; although they are fairly durable.

Thanks for your response Lukeness! Greatly appreciated. I think then that the issue is clear, these are "natural" insofar as they are mined, but the treatments should be disclosed properly. I seldom buy gems which have been treated, preferring purely cut and/or polished stones (my choice) and am a little disappointed to find out that treatments (whether they are standard or not) have not been disclosed.

 

The other two posters on this thread so far (CaliCraft & Gems and Watermelon101) are meticulous in detailing whether items have been treated or not - with CC&G noting "treatment unknown" where there is room for doubt - while Watermelon101 collects his own from source - and does all the cutting and polishing (two of my fave gem and stone sellers these - :grin: LOL), so I suppose that is why they have commented on the issue.

 

The fact that both of them have met with a gruff response from the seller in question is rather tragic though, since just the addition of the treatment description to the auction listing would really be important. In my opinion I may as well have bought pretty coloured glass :twisted: !!!

 

Anyhow, thanks all for the info - greatly appreciate it!:smile:

 

Must say that I wish I had asked this before buying a whole lot of dyed and treated stones which I had thought were totally natural - just cut and polished - DANG!!:oops::evil:

Edited by MsPlod

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MsPlod

OK - so I sent a question to this trader...

 

Absolutely STUNNING Blue CRAZY LACE AGATE gemstone! UNIQUE! penny2007 (4670 rating5.gif) verifieduser.gif

 

Question 18 Feb 2011 11:41

Hi there

Is this stone dyed or otherwise treated in any way?

Thanks!

 

 

Answer 18 Feb 2011 11:47

Hi you! My supplier is very "open" and always faithfully declares ALL treatments of gems! This one was described as being "natural" IF it is dyed, someone has done an excellent job!

 

Hmmmmmm.....????:wondering:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cali Craft and Gems

Sorry to say but it does not take a brain surgeon to know that some gems (especially agates, etc) have been dyed to get special colours and effects! It is also very easy to do a search on the net to find out more about the items you're purchasing in from your suppliers. I still do searches for other info when purchasing items if I'm unsure about anything - after 8+ years in the trade I do not know everything (yet)!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TopDrawer

The stones in question may or may not be dyed but I don't think anybody can make judgments on chemical composition from images.

Quoting from the net - “In structure and chemical composition agate is very similar to quartz, which in turn is a variety of chalcedony. It may be banded in many different and vibrant colours, such as blues, greens, browns, reds and white. Blue and green agate is the most desirable colour as it tends to be rarer than the other colours. Agate can form in lots of different types of rock, but is mainly associated with volcanic rocks where surrounding chemicals influence the colour”

Blue lace agate is a very popular form of agate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MsPlod

I must say that this is a little ray of hope for me... thanks Top Drawer, I'll investigate that further!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lukeness

Agreed, there are often many colours of agates and anything based on a picture alone is assumption only. The colours of SOME of those are, however, very saturated and of hues that would be very unusual to find in natural, untreated material. But you are, of course, right; without a proper hands-on examination there is no way of knowing for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
watermelon101

Not totally convinced....

Unfortunately, the blue crack line running through the bottom half of the stone, it is a tell tale sign that this item was probably dyed.

There are some good imitations out there that are difficult to spot with the eye especially from images, but flaws (i.e. cracks/inclusions/fractures) tend to indicate whether the dye treatment was used, especially on banded agates.

 

Another question - Is this Agate or Chrysocolla ? Seeing that it is the only natural mineral that occurs with this specific color in question.:thinking:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Celebrity Jewels

Hi All

 

I completely agree with all replies. Agate is dyed to enhance the beauty of the stone. This is common and as you will all agree most stones have had one treatment or another but this should be disclosed on the item listing.

Regards

Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×