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Pierre_Henri

Metal Detecting Cape Town, South Africa

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MsPlod
Well I'm waiting for my MD from the UK to arrive any day now by Royal Mail. And it may not be the fanciest of gadgets but I intend having great fun with it and, no doubt, walking around a lot more than I do at present! lol

We need to locate some fun spots to practice using these little beginner's gadgets. You should have some very interesting old sites around Grahamstown?

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Cold Sea
tell that to the 4 yr old in England.

 

He should play the Lotto :grin:

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lilythepink
We need to locate some fun spots to practice using these little beginner's gadgets. You should have some very interesting old sites around Grahamstown?

 

Yes, there are good sites around here and also the beach at Port Alfred, Kenton-on-Sea and Cannon Rocks, et al, could be worth investigating ...! But you'll have to come here and have a holiday with us so we can do a "united" search!

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unicoin

Metal Detector

 

Just for interest sake. I have listed my metal detector on bid or buy under Hobbies, Other Hobbies.

 

If it is illegal to inform forum about my listing, I appologise. Not so clever with the link thing.

 

Regards

 

http://www.bidorbuy.co.za/item/29524335/Metal_Detector_Garrett_ACE_250_High_Performance_Metal_Detector_hardly_used.html

Edited by admin
Inserted link to auction

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wayjen

Very nice unicoin.

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MsPlod

Lovely MD and excellent advertisement!

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lilythepink
Lovely MD and excellent advertisement!

 

Definitely a good ad MD! But you live in Cape Town so why not join the band and come MD-ing with the rest of us? (My MD is still in transit but I intend taking it to CT this holiday!) :grin: Let the novices reign supreme with their "starter" MD's - one of us could be in for a pleasant surprise. That's my opinion and I'm sticking to it.

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wayjen

Please remember to bring a few cents with you to buy a colddrink when you go hunting.

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unicoin

Hi lilythepink,

 

Let's see what happens with the auction. Otherwise I might take you up on that. Let me know when you are in Cape Town.

 

Only problem is, if we treasure hunt together and we both find the same spot for the treasure, who is going to take it. Do not want to fight about our big

treasure we are going to find. LOL:laugh:

 

Still crazy about your winking parrett. Love birds.

 

Regards

Andrea

 

.

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Guest Guest

Australian parrot

 

Hi Andrea

 

That winking parrot is Australian .. a sulphur crested cockatoo .. or

Scientific name: Cacatua galerita

Family: Cacatuidae

Order: Psittaciformes

 

Don't you just love scientists :)

 

I see them every day together with rosellas, pink and greys, and lorikeets..

 

Sulphur crested's are very intelligent, cheeky and brave.. rather like lily :)

 

Kind regards

 

Scott Balson

Edited by ndoa18

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wayjen

Scott, I am sure there is a ventriloquist behind all this parrot business.

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lilythepink

Thanks for the compliment, Scott. But you did forget to add "clown" into the mix!

 

One Beak in my life is enough and can do plenty of damage to wood if not kept under constant watch! My computer desk is testimonial to that. I'd hate to hear the noise which a flock of cockatoos make, let alone all the damage a flock could do to fences, beach railings, etc. Another thing, they speak prolifically but not as clearly as African Greys. The Beak used to say "Hello Everybody" very clearly but for some reason he's now taken to saying "Hello AirBody"!! Has also bastardised the names of our garden man and our domestic cleaner - Johnson and Joyce. He calls them both "Johnsis".

 

Back to the metal detecting - I will definitely NOT have him on my shoulder whilst I am out doing that. He gets too jealous of anything I seem to be concentrating on to his exclusion and I do not need another nip!

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Angolo Antico
The Garrett Metal Detector was imported from America and cost me, last year R3600-00. Still have all the invoices.

There is a instruction DVD, instruction Manual etc. At least it is definately not from China. I also did some research.

Not everybody can afford a R10 000-00 metal detector or want to pay that money for a new hobby. I am sure this will do for a beginner.

 

This one still have its original batteries.

 

You can go to www.garrett.com for further information.

 

Will in an way put it on bid or buy

 

The Ace 250 will be your best bet for beginners & novice users, a VERY good machine for the buck. I use my Ace 250 ( R3600.00+ ) all the time in parks / beaches in dry sand ( wet sand / salt will make it go crazy ) / fields, as I can swing it all day long, but for more serious work, I will use my Ace GTI 2500 ( R12000.00+ )

 

This is one of those hobbies that will stick for years to come and natural human curiosity will keep it alive! BEST of luck to all those hunting, may the gold find you!

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unicoin

Hi Scott,

 

It appeares that you are not from South Africa, here the parrot thing is like a fashion most people got one. Would like one myself, but my husband do not

want me to have one, maybe he is scared that I will talk more to the bird than to him.

 

I sometime talk to the little one next door, beautiful green with a black bow tie and his name is John Deere. I call him over the wall then he reply "Hello John Deere" So loud and clear.

 

Regards

Andrea

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lilythepink
Hi Scott,

 

It appeares that you are not from South Africa, here the parrot thing is like a fashion most people got one. Would like one myself, but my husband do not

want me to have one, maybe he is scared that I will talk more to the bird than to him.

 

I sometime talk to the little one next door, beautiful green with a black bow tie and his name is John Deere. I call him over the wall then he reply "Hello John Deere" So loud and clear.

 

Regards

Andrea

 

Any person who has a parrot as a "fashion accessory" needs their head read! The Beak is my "child", seldom closed in a cage and given all the love and attention of any two-year-old human child. I am fortunate that my husband and I are able to give him all the attention he needs. He is a "rescued bird" from a wealthy family who bought him and because they couldn't handle him properly let alone love him enough, he became aggressive and kept attacking them and seriously injuring the wife. We've had him for nearly 6 years now and he's the most gentle, loving creature anyone could imagine but it took a lot of time and patience to get him to calm down and it stills takes much time and love to keep him happy and non-aggressive!

 

I do NOT recommend a parrot to anyone who is silly enough to look upon a parrot as a "fashion accessory"!

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Guest Guest

Not on topic.. smiles

 

Hi Lily

 

Until a few years ago my back deck looked out over the Brisbane river and, from my office, I could look at the parkland across the river – unobstructed but by an old dead tree on the river bank below. The branches of this tree were in line with the river below. Each morning at about 7am, like clockwork, a flock of about fifty wild sulphur crested cockatoos would settle in the tree and carry on like a bunch of monkeys fighting over a banana.

 

I loved the spectacle and would sit and watch .. after about half an hour they would fly off and find another place to chew the proverbial fat.

 

I embarked on a simple experiment buying a large moulded cement bird bath and filling it with kilos of seed (parrot food). After a few weeks some of the braver cockatoos came and checked out the new source of breakfast and within days the whole tribe followed.

 

I should explain - I had large glass sliding doors between my office and the cement deck overlooking the river. In the early days I kept the glass doors closed so the birds could hardly see me through the reflection. After a few weeks I opened up the door and sat and watched. The cockatoos came down and grazed on the seed (I got through 20kg a week!) even though I was now fully visible.

 

The birdbath with the seed was only fifteen feet from where I stood and, as only a few of the dominant birds could hold a position on the top most were scattered around the cement deck squawking and carrying on like the proverbial pork chop.

 

It was an amazing experience sitting there – just feet from the wild birds becoming part of their amazing lives. What I soon realised is that their sulphur crests are their “form of identification” because whenever they engaged another the crests would go up.. it was so funny.

 

After a few months the birds got so accustomed to me that they would come into my office (large about three bedrooms in size) and walk around as if they owned the place. I would just sit there and do my work while watching…

 

A couple of the wild birds became so tame that they would land on my desk and engage me in conversation.. their wild bright eyes gleaming at me.. crests going up and down.

 

The tamest, I called “baldy” (don’t ask).. would sit on my keyboard while I scratched him. (Have posted a pic of "Baldy" here: http://www.gwb.com.au/baldy.jpg)

 

They are amazing birds and I really miss the experience now that I have moved closer to the city.. but I do now have rosellas breeding in my roof… and hope to catch that on camera ..

 

See: Chick Cam - see the rosellas nest, chicks grow - live!

 

Kind regards

 

Scott Balson

Edited by ndoa18

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lilythepink

Scott, what a beautiful story and you write so well that I can close my eyes and picture the delightful scene. But who cleaned up the "poos" from your office floor? lol You are a most amazing person!

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republikein

Just for interest sake. I took my metal detector with a year ago (December 2009) when my sons had to play chess in Cape Town. I tested it on the beach at Bloubergstrand once or twice. I did not find anything at all, but... late on afternoon we came across a gentleman from England looking for the keyes of his rented car which he lost in the sand. He had already been looking without success for quite some time. We were the only people on miles of empty white sand. Naturally I offered to help. I could not imagine how difficult it is to find a big metal object in a few square metres... and the trust in my metal detector was almost lost. Not to speak about my own self-confidence. What a relief when I found the keyes! As a result my sons were offered a R100 each for the "treasure" found on Bloubergstrand! Apparently much cheaper than the process of duplicating the keyes to a rented new Volkswagen Combi.

 

The lesson here is that a metal detector can come in handy for other non-coin applications too. What a pleasure to be able to help this person.

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wayjen
Just for interest sake. I took my metal detector with a year ago (December 2009) when my sons had to play chess in Cape Town. I tested it on the beach at Bloubergstrand once or twice. I did not find anything at all, but... late on afternoon we came across a gentleman from England looking for the keyes of his rented car which he lost in the sand. He had already been looking without success for quite some time. We were the only people on miles of empty white sand. Naturally I offered to help. I could not imagine how difficult it is to find a big metal object in a few square metres... and the trust in my metal detector was almost lost. Not to speak about my own self-confidence. What a relief when I found the keyes! As a result my sons were offered a R100 each for the "treasure" found on Bloubergstrand! Apparently much cheaper than the process of duplicating the keyes to a rented new Volkswagen Combi.

 

The lesson here is that a metal detector can come in handy for other non-coin applications too. What a pleasure to be able to help this person.

 

correct, was it by any chance a R10 000 metal detector?

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lilythepink

Wish he'd answer your question, Wayne!

 

And I am still waiting for my MD to arrive from the UK. Am told it can take up to 3 weeks to arrive ...

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republikein

It was a Viking VK30 which I bought AN (almost new) for R1000+ on BOB...

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lilythepink

See, Wayne. We're going to be able to do wonderful things with our relatively inexpensive MDs. I thought so ...

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wayjen

Wonderful news indeed.

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JPBon

friend of mine who does this told me he has a few he uses, for different purposes, thing that differs between them is the depth that they detect to. If its the likes of beaches etc you want to scour then the chances are that there is some stuff closer to the surface, then the cheapies should pick it up. The more pro machines will obviously detect stuff which are buried deeper.

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lilythepink
friend of mine who does this told me he has a few he uses, for different purposes, thing that differs between them is the depth that they detect to. If its the likes of beaches etc you want to scour then the chances are that there is some stuff closer to the surface, then the cheapies should pick it up. The more pro machines will obviously detect stuff which are buried deeper.

 

Well I think I'll be quite happy scanning the "surface" of the beaches, JP. Otherwise we'd have to cart a spade with us and digging deep holes is definitely not what I would call fun! Hopefully the tide will bring treasures to shore and we'll find them before they get on their way to the middle of the earth? No harm in being optimistic, I think.

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