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RISadler

DSLR v Compact Article...

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MsPlod

Also do NOT agree!!

 

Just read this article Buying a DSLR or Digital Compact Camera, that is the question and must say that I completely disagree.

 

Too many people end up buying vast amounts of expensive equipment that they never use. I spent months looking into the DSLR versus compact issue and ended up buying another compact to replace my little 3.1mp "workhorse".

 

Not sure whether I am allowed to specify brands and models but suffice it to say that my new camera has a 20x optical zoom (80x digital zoom), high resolution (too high actually), full automatic AND full manual operation - users choice - supermacro function, hi-res video and photography in exceptionally poor light, image stabilisation, face recognition, etc. etc. etc.

 

The total I paid (at the beginning of this year) for my camera (one of the best known brands for expert photography) with memory cards, several sets of rechargeable batteries (normal AAs - not the wildly expensive lithium jobs), a really good quality camera bag AND a mini tripod came to less than I would have paid for the lowest entry level DSLR (which would only have come with a standard lens - no spare batteries, no camera bag, etc. etc.).

 

I am still learning to use this new compact and keep finding all sorts of new aspects to it - awesome quality pics, excellent resolution - could keep singing the praises.

 

Yes a decent DSLR would be nice to have, but for the equivalent DSLR (and accessories) I would be forking out around R15 - 20 grand, AND having to lug a huge camera bag everywhere I go.

 

Now I can be photographing a landscape then within seconds a flower and again within seconds a tiny insect (love macro-photography).

 

Will post two photos (not my best pics but just for example) one taken with my old 3.1mp camera and the second with my new 12mp super compact!

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Lukeness

It's over simplified a bit but I can't really see anything completely wrong. It all depends on your usage and applications. I use both a compact and a dSLR and find them both invaluable for different reasons.

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MsPlod

3.1mp close up of fly

 

PA080058_fly2_crop.JPG

 

yes it IS noisy - but not too shabby for a little 3.1mp camera - this fly species is roughly 9mm in length. It is sitting on the tip of a vygie leaf

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MsPlod

With a 12mp compact camera...

 

IMG_1543_Spider_salty_crop.JPG

 

Again - slightly noisy - but this spider is roughly 3mm long, those little flowers it is sitting on are the inside of a daisy flower. Hmmm...

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BumbleBee

Wow, that is a really great pic!

 

I'm also nuts about macro photography, so I've been looking for a DSLR with a good macro lens but the prices are just silly, I'm sorry but thats just how I feel about it. I have been using a Sony DSC-H1 for a good few years now and must say that it is an awesome little camera. I'v been looking at the replacement model with the hi-res tilting screen (quite handy for macro photoraphy) but was put off by the Li-ion battery pack where my H1 still uses the trusty old penlights. So, for the time being I have stopped looking and spent the money on something totally unrelated. I will start looking again if my H1 ever packs up.

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RISadler

BumbleBee, even though I have a DSLR, for macro work I prefer my Canon PowerShot A620 with a Canon 250D close-up filter.

 

IMG_1360.JPG

 

In many cases a compact is a much better macro camera than a DSLR. For instance, due to the smaller sensor, a compact has much more depth of field than a DSLR lens.

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Scarboro Fair
BumbleBee, even though I have a DSLR, for macro work I prefer my Canon PowerShot A620 with a Canon 250D close-up filter.

 

In many cases a compact is a much better macro camera than a DSLR. For instance, due to the smaller sensor, a compact has much more depth of field than a DSLR lens.

Hear hear!

 

Looking at the lengths the DSLR macro photographers have to go through to get macro shots it is quite a thing to do - extra tubes and things just to get the distance.:confused:

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RISadler
Too many people end up buying vast amounts of expensive equipment that they never use.

 

Yes a decent DSLR would be nice to have, but for the equivalent DSLR (and accessories) I would be forking out around R15 - 20 grand, AND having to lug a huge camera bag everywhere I go.

 

I agree. Too many people purchase expensive DSLR cameras and then use it with a mediocre "kit" lens in automatic mode. Basically they then have an expensive point-and-shoot that actually produces worse pictures than a compact camera.

 

My big beef with that article is that it says you need a DSLR to take good pictures, or pictures in low light, or etc. Take the low light for instance, the standard "kit" lens on a Canon EOS 550D has a maximum aperture of f/3.5-5.6 - that is f/5.6 at 55mm!

 

My PowerShot A620 is f/2.8-4.1, which is heaps better.

 

And f/5.6 for a 55mm lens is just plain atrocious. For a similar lens at f/2.8 you need to plonk down an additional R12K and my 50-plus-year-old Super-Takumar lenses, which are f/1.4 (50mm) and f/1.8 (55mm) respectively, will still create better pictures.

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RISadler
Looking at the lengths the DSLR macro photographers have to go through to get macro shots it is quite a thing to do - extra tubes and things just to get the distance.:confused:

 

And the top macro lens from Canon is manual focus!

 

On the other hand, I must also just mention that with the right DSLR kit you can take bigger-than-lifesize pictures.

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MsPlod

Agreed... Nothing wrong with DSLR

 

And the top macro lens from Canon is manual focus!

 

On the other hand, I must also just mention that with the right DSLR kit you can take bigger-than-lifesize pictures.

 

But, it is a pity that the good compacts are not given the credit for how much they can really do.

 

Here is a quote from a photographer I really admire...

 

"Cameras don't take pictures, photographers do. Cameras are just another artist's tool." (Ken Rockwell)

 

Of course a good camera in practised hands is a really fine tool, but for the average photographer a good compact - with all the recent digital developments - is often more than enough.

 

Doesn't mean to say that I am not saving up for a really cool DSLR - WITH all the trappings... :P

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RISadler
But, it is a pity that the good compacts are not given the credit for how much they can really do.

 

And that is why I disagree with the article. But then, on the other hand, it is probably written with the objective to encourage sales of DSLR cameras and accessories, rather than to actually educate.

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Craig
And that is why I disagree with the article. But then, on the other hand, it is probably written with the objective to encourage sales of DSLR cameras and accessories, rather than to actually educate.

 

I see you've all been rather busy reading some articles! That is great!

 

I agree with the article in that you definitely do have more control over what is going on in the shot you take with a DSLR, but I guess it is true that many do not ever explore what they can actually do with their equipment (and thats a costly exercise for average holiday snaps).

 

Why don't you educate and write an article on digital compacts?

We can include a link to the author's items listed on bidorbuy :-)

 

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RISadler
you definitely do have more control over what is going on in the shot you take with a DSLR

 

My Canon PowerShot A620 has:

  • P, Tv, Av and M modes, apart from the regular "Basic Zone" modes;
  • manual focus, apart from the 9-point AF system;
  • selectable metering modes, which include spotmetering (something most entry-level DSLR don't have!)
  • manual exposure compensation;
  • and even "Stitch Assist" for panoramic images!
  • also, with a bit of fiddling, I can get the camera to throw out RAW images!

In fact, when comparing this point&shoot with an entry-level DSLR, you have more control with the former than with the latter - apart obviously from the ability to change lenses.

 

But I will acknowledge that the flagship DSLR's from Canon and Nikon (but not Pentax) beat it - by a narrow inch - just - like John Wayne said: "I'd hate to live off the difference."

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RISadler
Why don't you educate and write an article on digital compacts?

 

OK, but who will provide the evaluation cameras?

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MsPlod
OK, but who will provide the evaluation cameras?

 

Not really sure what Craig is getting at here with this comment? :confused: - bit confused...

 

"We can include a link to the author's items listed on bidorbuy :-)"

 

Which author Craig? - any guesses anyone else? - certainly not RIsadler... No compacts for sale there that I can see...

 

 

There are so many compacts on the market and an incredible number of well-researched (even unbiased) evaluations, reviews and comparisons of both DSLR and compacts on internet, Craig. It is just a great pity that an article such as the one which RISadler commented on to start this thread does not reflect the information very well.

 

A number of the top compacts are readily able to do almost everything that the lower end (entry level) DSLRs can do - even with several large outlays on lenses for the DSLRs.

 

My compact is the Canon PowerShot SX20 IS and the specs not only look impressive - they are impressive. I used (and LOVED) SLRs for nearly thirty years and am now just loving the capacity of the compact - not having to change lenses, carry a large bag, etc. etc. is a HUGE plus for me. I have full manual (or automatic) control over my SX20 and am still learning its capacity - several months and over 10,000 photos (from supermacro to full zoom) later.

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RISadler

MsPlod, just to give an idea of the type of photographic equipment user I am... The PowerShot is used for practically everything, from macro to holiday snaps to just about anything and anytime I don't feel like thinking. The Canon EOS 30D is used with manual focus lenses and is where I really enjoy the photographic hobby... Sunny-16 rule, Sekonic L-6 lightmeter (50 years old!) and compose, focus, click.

 

IMHO, entry-level DSLR's are a waste of money, as they come with mediocre lenses and are severely crippled in functionality. Any decent compact or bridge camera beats them to a pulp.

 

Did you know that Canon uses the same processor chip in all their cameras, from the budget P&S's to the uber-DSLR's?

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Lukeness

But the image sensors are not the same.

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MsPlod
MsPlod, just to give an idea of the type of photographic equipment user I am... The PowerShot is used for practically everything, from macro to holiday snaps to just about anything and anytime I don't feel like thinking. The Canon EOS 30D is used with manual focus lenses and is where I really enjoy the photographic hobby... Sunny-16 rule, Sekonic L-6 lightmeter (50 years old!) and compose, focus, click.

 

IMHO, entry-level DSLR's are a waste of money, as they come with mediocre lenses and are severely crippled in functionality. Any decent compact or bridge camera beats them to a pulp.

 

Did you know that Canon uses the same processor chip in all their cameras, from the budget P&S's to the uber-DSLR's?

 

Yup - did several months homework on the compact vs DSLR issue before deciding to buy the SX20.

 

Relate totally to the enjoyment of fiddling with lenses and lightmeters and lighting and all the bits (when I have the time - like on holidays).:)

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RISadler
But the image sensors are not the same.

 

The lens on the compact is optimised for the sensor and the sensor is optimised for the lens, which is not so with a DSLR.

 

In fact, the sensor on my PowerShot A620 can do ASA 50, which most DSLR's can't do. This speed is simply great for landscapes in the Karoo. OK, granted the max. of ASA 400 isn't spectacular, but then again if you need a low-light DSLR (which isn't anything "entry-level") you also need a lens that can handle it, like the R16K Canon EF 24mm f/1.4 L USM.

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admin
Not really sure what Craig is getting at here with this comment? :confused: - bit confused...

 

"We can include a link to the author's items listed on bidorbuy :-)"

 

Which author Craig? - any guesses anyone else? - certainly not RIsadler... No compacts for sale there that I can see...

 

 

 

I thing Craig meant for RISadler to write an article on the bidorbuy Blog about digital compacts and they would include a link to his profile so everyone who reads it can view his items. Good exposure ;)

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RISadler

Here's the article:

 

...........................

 

Looking for a secondhand compact digital camera? Get a Canon PowerShot A620.

 

Looking for a new compact digital camera? Get a Canon PowerShot D10.

 

Looking for a secondhand DSLR camera? Get a Pentax *istDS and a bag full of inexpensive, but unsurpassed, PENTAX-M and PENTAX-A manual focus lenses.

 

Looking for a new DSLR camera? Get a Canon EOS 7D (without the kit lens) and a Canon EF 24mm f/1.4 L II USM lens.

 

...........................

 

Now where's my link?

 

:D:D:D

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admin

For that half baked attempt, this is all you get........:P

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RISadler

Hey, if Woolies can sell half-baked bread, why can't I write half-baked articles?

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Lukeness

you want half a link to your profile then?

lol

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