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    Pierre_Henri

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/23/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    My wife and I have just returned from a road-trip through central Namibia. We stayed for 3 days in Swakopmund, a beautiful coastal town in the desert, established by German colonists in 1892. Even to this day, the German language is spoken by a large number of the townspeople. In an attempt to make Swakopmund more attractive for visitors, a competition was initiated in the early 1950s by the Swakopmund Municipality. This competition was won by the local dentist, Dr. Alfons Weber, and this led to the founding of the Swakopmund Museum in 1951(In 1931 Dr. Weber left his native Munich, Germany, to settle in the then Southwest Africa) I visited the museum on Monday and was greatly and positively surprised by its beautiful and informative displays. Even more surprising was the numismatic collection(s) hosted by the museum. The one display shows the coins, tokens & notes that circulated in the old days in South West Africa (present-day Namibia) including Paul Kruger Z.A.R. coins and notes – I did not know that they circulated as far north in Africa as this. The second display shows medals and medallions – mostly of German origin - a truly stunning collection. The third display shows shipwreck coins and related maritime artifacts: - the Namibian “skeleton coast” is notorious for its abundance of shipwrecks, some dating back to the 1500s when the Portuguese seafarers were travelling around the Cape of Good Hope in their trade-voyages with the East. I would recommend this museum to anyone interested in history and especially numismatics.
  2. 2 points
    The coins all have messages & themes regarding empty promises like freedom for this and rights for that etc etc. It's a pity the SA Mint don't issue a coin with the message "STOP CORRUPTION" and let the government use the income of the coin-sales to actually do something about their endless empty promises ...
  3. 1 point
    And that is exactly the point, how can any one culture, or nation disregard the past. In our case, from pre-colonisation to colonisation, from concentration camps to apartheid to now. All of these events are portrayed by way of collectables, be it coins, beads, art , or vuvuzela's. The current mood of wanting to ban everything to do with colonialism and apartheid is naive. The next generation may not be interested in collecting pre 1994 items, but why deny them these items if someday they prefer to collect them. P.S. Judging by testrarossa's post, it might be the only thing left to collect, as that R5 vault looks like a hot one in Dubai.
  4. 1 point
    I think that what was in the past was in the past. Apartheid had a horrific effect on the majority of the population, with the bitter fruit being that the pendulum has now swung the other way and today post-apartheid has seen the legal marginalisation of the minority. To my mind, two wrongs have never made a right. The old South African flag is meaningless to me and many others, and I do not see any reason to either defend it or to obliterate its presence everywhere. However, this flag was the symbol of the State of a time which is now history. One cannot teach the children of today regarding the terrible wrongs that were done under apartheid if facts and features of that era are hidden in a fog of Orwellian knowing-ignorance and forgetfulness. Re coins and notes (and stamps), they do not harm anybody. Add the presence of the old flag on such numismatic material and you have a simple curiosity, a symbol of a dreadful past out of the ashes of which rose the hopes of an entire nation for a bright new future - free of the shackles of racism and discrimination and a wish for prosperity for all. So "no" - I do not see anything wrong in collecting such numismatic material.....
  5. 1 point
    Nice write-up, Sounds like you had a good time.
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