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    sik liquidation centre

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/22/2017 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    This question relates to all of this sellers items: http://www.bidorbuy.co.za/item/279344304/247_KWC_FULL_METAL_SLIDE_FULL_WEIGHT_4_5_CAL_395FPS_R1895_00.html The seller's shipping options make no sense. I wish to buy multiple items, however the shipping fees aren't justified. The 1st item shipping costs R170, however he 2nd item costs almost double that to be shipped. How is it possible? That meant R520 shipping for 2 items, which the couriers charges less than half that. I have no problem paying for add on shipping for additional items, however inflating shipping on secondary items to almost double that of the first makes no sense. I suspect it is in order for buyers not to buy more than one of each item. Or to pay bidorbuy less commission, since the seller must be profiting more on shipping . I need some advice on this matter since my understanding was that sellers should not use the shipping option for profiting ? By selling an item for cheap and charge a huge amount in shipping, the seller would be paying bidorbuy almost no commission , whilst making big money on shipping. This in my view chases away many buyers . Regards
  2. 1 point
    Reminds me of the song....I who have nothing by Tom Jones....maybe I should send the lyrics to Wayne
  3. 1 point
    I think the "coin" in Bitcoin is as close you are going to get to making a comparison between coin investing and cryptocurrencies. Lemme just start by saying I know very little about "numismatics", I can barely spell it... Anyway, the idea behind cryptocurrencies is to be used as a digital currency for day to day transactions but as Cold Sea said, every second guy is "investing" in it. The value is completely driven by emotion, supply and demand and it is EXTREMELY volatile: Japan's government announces that Bitcoin is now a legal currency - the price jumps Two month's later China starts locking down on exchanges declaring them illegal - the price drops A week later there is positive news with regards to the exchanges out of Japan - the price jumps As far as volatility goes: In August the price of Bitcoin basically doubled: $2000 - $4000. That's 100% growth in 30 days In June Ether (another cryptocurrency) crashed from $390 to $0.10 in a few seconds. That's basically a 99.7% loss in seconds. And it's all because of the infancy/immaturity of these systems that need to be ironed out first. What happened, in this case, is that somebody placed a sell trade worth millions. This caused the price to drop which started triggering stop losses which started a chain reaction. Some guy had earlier placed an order to buy a lot of Ether at 10c and when it hit that price it executed. The price then jumped back up - a lot of people lost a lot of money and one guy became an instant millionaire. These cryptocurrencies are more like gold mining where the gold is supposed to be used for trade but instead hoarded. The underlying technology which these cryptocurrencies are running on is also susceptible to the issues and glitches. In August, because Bitcoin was becoming too slow, there was a hard fork because an agreement on the way forward couldn't be reached. A hard fork is literally a divergence in the source code and from that point forward you effectively have two separate coins instead of one. That is apparently going happen again now the end of October/November. Storing of your coins is another technical issue - you either store it on an exchange like Luno (South African company in Stellenbosch) just like you would in a bank, but that is very susceptible to hacking. In fact, there have been numerous hacks this year where people lost a lot of money simply because it was stolen (like the bank vault in the Wild West being taken by a gang of robbers). The money is simply gone. The solution is to store it offline either on your computer, a flash drive or a "vault" which is a piece of hardware specifically made to securely store your coins. Yes...that is the solution in a world where we are trying to push everything to the cloud. In a world where we are searching for convenience, we are forced to move backwards for security's sake. Keeping all that in mind and not touching on subjects like what will happen to the value of these currencies when they start being regulated, do you still want to invest? It is technically daunting for the average guy and he is a sitting duck with a few coins waiting to make a mistake. So, For short-term speculating, there probably isn't a better investment if you are looking for huge gains. Just like Forex. For the medium long-term, it's still a great investment if you can stomach the volatility and you are willing to accept the risk. Long-term though, there's just way too much uncertainty. And I reckon by the time the certainty is there it'll either have settled into a role as a regular currency with no reason to "invest" in it or it'll still be to risky given my age. I'm 31 now, made a few bucks with BTC but not very eager to jump back in. Like a "boring" person, I stick to ETFs, shares and unit trusts. That's from one cautious "techie's" point of view.
  4. 1 point
    Bought 30th august . Settled 4th October Rating from seller Comment: Buyer deserves a smiley face.Lightening fast payment.
  5. 1 point
    Oh my word. I thought we had banned you Looks like the US has become too dull for you and you need some local action :-) - Let us know when you list your first batch of covfefe from Nambia.
  6. 1 point
    Hi Yvonne First the post office caused a delay. Then your parcel finally arrived at your local post office and was not collected. Then I had to resend it to you which I did at my own cost in the interest of customer service. And you did receive the rings. I know you were angry but the South African Post Office is who you should have been very angry with. Kindest regards Mark
  7. 1 point
    Has anyone ever approached SANGS for comment on this issue?, I am a fairly new collector and have started using SANGS as I believe in supporting our local experts. I am concerned that this will come back to bite me. If we work with them rather than against them I believe that they will improve. Perhaps some you guys should meet with them and point out their mistakes.
  8. 1 point
    Mike Klee asks a very interesting question regarding the silver Scheepjesgulden that was sent to the Cape in 1803 and introduced in 1806 here as the first coins struck specifically for South Africa (Cape of Good Hope). “For a coinage that was in circulation, what happened to them all? Why aren't they found by metal-detectorists” Let me start off by saying that finding (metal detecting) ANY pre-Victorian coins in South Africa is a rare occurrence. (However, I must state that we are not talking about shipwrecked coins – they are fairly frequently found by underwater detectorists) Coins from the first quarter of the 1800s and earlier, are seldom found on dry land here. The few that I have found I could count on the fingers of one hand. My oldest was a Charles I Rose Farthing that was interestingly enough struck before Jan van Riebeeck landed at the Cape in 1652. I have also found a Dutch India Company Doit from the late 1600s or early 1700s and a 1797 Cartwheel Penny. So I have never found a silver coin dating from the period of the VOC/ Dutch occupation of the Cape (pre 1806) and even the fairly common Georgian silver coins from 1816 to 1836 were only found on the rarest of occasions – I may have found two or three. And it was not due to a lack of trying - I have detected with friends from 1997 till around 2012 on a weekly basis – sometimes we would go out twice a week and during holidays every single day finding literarily 1000s upon 1000s of coins over the period. Our detectors were set to discriminate against modern “clad” coins, so the nickel coins minted after 1964 and the cladded coins minted after 1989, were not even dug up by us But between the whole group of us (we were about 20 metal detectorists searching in the Western Cape at that time – mostly the beaches - but also other sites from time to time) pre-Victorian coins were seldom found and called for a glass of Champagne when a strike was indeed made. Obviously, in a country like England, pre-Victorian coins are found on a daily basis by hundreds of detectorists – but at the Cape in the olden days, things seem to be not the same… Here is a picture of me joining an American & Canadian group of metal detectorists on a detecting trip to England a few years ago (2010 I think) – but that is obviously a different story …
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