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    Pierre_Henri

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/29/2017 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Mike Klee asks a very interesting question regarding the silver Scheepjesgulden that was sent to the Cape in 1803 and introduced in 1806 here as the first coins struck specifically for South Africa (Cape of Good Hope). “For a coinage that was in circulation, what happened to them all? Why aren't they found by metal-detectorists” Let me start off by saying that finding (metal detecting) ANY pre-Victorian coins in South Africa is a rare occurrence. (However, I must state that we are not talking about shipwrecked coins – they are fairly frequently found by underwater detectorists) Coins from the first quarter of the 1800s and earlier, are seldom found on dry land here. The few that I have found I could count on the fingers of one hand. My oldest was a Charles I Rose Farthing that was interestingly enough struck before Jan van Riebeeck landed at the Cape in 1652. I have also found a Dutch India Company Doit from the late 1600s or early 1700s and a 1797 Cartwheel Penny. So I have never found a silver coin dating from the period of the VOC/ Dutch occupation of the Cape (pre 1806) and even the fairly common Georgian silver coins from 1816 to 1836 were only found on the rarest of occasions – I may have found two or three. And it was not due to a lack of trying - I have detected with friends from 1997 till around 2012 on a weekly basis – sometimes we would go out twice a week and during holidays every single day finding literarily 1000s upon 1000s of coins over the period. Our detectors were set to discriminate against modern “clad” coins, so the nickel coins minted after 1964 and the cladded coins minted after 1989, were not even dug up by us But between the whole group of us (we were about 20 metal detectorists searching in the Western Cape at that time – mostly the beaches - but also other sites from time to time) pre-Victorian coins were seldom found and called for a glass of Champagne when a strike was indeed made. Obviously, in a country like England, pre-Victorian coins are found on a daily basis by hundreds of detectorists – but at the Cape in the olden days, things seem to be not the same… Here is a picture of me joining an American & Canadian group of metal detectorists on a detecting trip to England a few years ago (2010 I think) – but that is obviously a different story …
  2. 1 point
    Tokens (found by means of a metal detector) are a lot scarcer than coins, and tokens from the 1800s are truly rare finds. Here are a few token finds that I am aware of … Both a 3d and 6d token of the Royal Field Artillery were found on one of our detecting trips on an old British Military Camp (Boer War era) near Harrismith in the Free State. I cannot find my pictures of the tokens, but interestingly enough and on the same day, this Victorian gold half sovereign was found. The picture shows it in “as dug” condition. I have found an EK Green Wine Merchant (Cape Town) token that was used circa 1903-1930. It was detected near the old airport building at Wingfield, Goodwood. In the olden days (pre 1954) Wingfield was the official airport of Cape Town. Here is a vintage picture of the airport building – the token was found near the clump of trees as indicated. One of the best token finds that I know of, is a very rare Blackwood & Couper Durban One Shilling Token found by a friend of mine on a sugar cane farm near Blythedale beach near Stanger in Kwa Zulu Natal. Here is the finding spot and a picture of a similar token of 1861 (not the one that was detected) Anther fabulous token find was recently made on a Durban beach, being an unrecorded Durban Model Dairy (5-Gallon) Token. Hern only records a ½ Gallon token for this dairy so a rare find indeed. The picture shows the token as it was found, and after a bit of careful cleaning. The finder writes To be continued …
  3. 1 point
    Here are pictures of two interesting local coin finds The first is an ancient Byzantine coin from 395 – 403 AD found near East London by Clarence Coetzer in 1955 (the were digging up a washing pole in their back yard and found the coin) Clarence speculates As a matter of interest, ancient coin finds have been made before in South Africa – in 1893, some Greek and Roman coins were found in Pondoland – see this link … But as our subject concerns colonial times, I think that the most interesting silver coin found locally (about 20 years ago) by a metal detectorist, is this coin found by my friend Wolfgang Roux, on his father-in-laws wine farm situated about 150 kilometers north of Cape Town in the Hex River Valley. It is a silver German 1/24 Thaler of 1624 struck in the name of Prince Wolfgang (the same name as the finders name!) found hundreds of years after it was minted – and in South Africa of all places! To be continued…
  4. 1 point
    Can you please add an "SA only" location filter. I think I'm not the only BoBer that aren't interested in the cheap Chinese rubbish that gets dumped lately. While we're at it how about a "no drop-shipper" filter. For me it's great fun going through the Crazy auction (picking bargain :wink:) BUT I'm not interested in importing stuff. I'm sure the coding to do this wouldn't take more than an hour or two; so pretty please!
  5. 1 point
    bidorbuy will be moving to HTTPS to improve online security and boost rankings in Google. Webmasters are encouraged to get SSL certificates for their websites. In June 2017, tradefeeds that provide non-HTTPS references and Bulk-Uploaders where 3rd party non-HTTPS image links are used will be disabled. What is SSL? SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is a standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between the website and the browser. SSL allows for sensitive information such as credit card number and login credentials to be transmitted securely.Normally, information sent between browsers and web servers is sent in plain text, leaving you vulnerable to online attackers. As a result of making use of SSL, websites making use of HTTPS will be given a boost in rankings on Google. Thus, webmasters are encouraged to implement security certificates in order to provide the best user experience possible and retain search rankings on Google. How do I get an SSL certificate? You will need a certificate from a Certificate Authority in order to enable HTTPS on your website. We recommend making use of Let’s Encrypt. It is a free, automated and open Certificate Authority. Help Article - https://support.bidorbuy.co.za/Knowledgebase/Article/View/220/24/https-images-requirement For more information please visit Google’s security blog https://security.googleblog.com/2017/01/the-foundation-of-more-secure-web.html https://security.googleblog.com/2015/12/indexing-https-pages-by-default.html
  6. 1 point
    I am all for the SA only filter. It really annoys me when looking for items to have to sift through pages of Hong Kong listed items . I will never buy from an overseas seller .
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